MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

GRADUATE HANDBOOK

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Purdue University

West Lafayette, IN

Table of Contents

GENERAL INFORMATION................................................................................................................ 2

OVERVIEW OF MATHEMATICS EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS........................................... 2

IMPORTANT PLACES & PEOPLE..................................................................................................... 3

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES............................................................................................................ 4

FINANCIAL AID................................................................................................................................ 7

            FELLOWSHIPS

LIFE AS A GRADUATE STUDENT................................................................................................... 16

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.................................................................................................. 18

ADVISING/COMMITTEES............................................................................................................. 23

GRADUATE COMPETENCIES......................................................................................................... 25

DISMISSAL POLICY....................................................................................................................... 27

DOCTORATE (PH.D) IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION.................................................................. 28

Ph.D. COURSE REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................................... 28

DESCRIPTION OF CORE DOCTORAL COURSES............................................................................. 29

DOCTORAL DEGREE PLAN OF STUDY GUIDELINES ..................................................................... 31

DEVELOPING THE PLAN OF STUDY (Ph.D.)................................................................................. 33

DOCTORAL STUDENT EXPECTATIONS........................................................................................ 37

TEACHING EXPERIENCES.............................................................................................................. 38

RESEARCH EXPERIENCES.............................................................................................................. 39

         Academic Integrity And Research Ethics  

         IRB

           Graduate Forms

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION GUIDELINES  ................................................................................ 41

PROPOSAL FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH................................................................................ 49

DISSERTATION............................................................................................................................. 50

ANNUAL REVIEW........................................................................................................................... 54

JOB SEARCH.................................................................................................................................. 55

MASTERŐS DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION..................................................................... 56

MASTERŐS DEGREE COURSE REQUIREMENTS.............................................................................. 56

TIMELINE FOR REVIEWS AND EVALUATIONS.............................................................................. 57

DESCRIPTION OF CORE MASTERŐS COURSES............................................................................... 58

MASTERŐS DEGREE PLAN OF STUDY GUIDELINES ....................................................................... 60

DEVELOPING THE PLAN OF STUDY (M.S.)................................................................................... 62

FIELD EXPERIENCE COMPONENTS OF MASTERŐS COURSES........................................................ 65

MASTERŐS PORTFOLIO  ............................................................................................................... 69

MASTERŐS FINAL EXAM (PORTFOLIO OR THESIS DEFENSE)....................................................... 74

ANNUAL REVIEW FOR MASTERŐS STUDENTS (GATE B)............................................................... 76

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

OVERVIEW OF MATHEMATICS EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS

 

The Purdue University Mathematics Education graduate programs are administered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education. A strong emphasis on pedagogical content knowledge and disciplinary content knowledge in improving schooling is a defining characteristic of our graduate programs. One degree is offered at the masterŐs level, a Master of Science (M.S.) and one at the doctoral level, a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

 

Through the MasterŐs Degree program in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Mathematics Education, students will further develop their instructional expertise, extend their knowledge of learners, deepen their subject matter knowledge, use educational research methods and engage in professional leadership activities. In particular, they will develop:

1)        A greater understanding of K-12 school mathematics and how to teach it;

2)        A foundation in the teaching and learning of mathematics to a range of age groups with diverse populations;

3)        A broader foundation in advanced mathematical sciences;

4)        An ability to interpret and critique research related to the teaching and learning of mathematics; and

5)        An ability to apply theoretical knowledge and research results in practical settings such as: mathematics instruction, mathematics teacher professional development, evaluation and assessment, supervision of teachers, curricula development and technology development.

 

The Ph.D. Degree program in Mathematics Education enrolls students who are knowledge- seekers and are eager to pursue educational problems and develop critical thinking skills in a collaborative environment. The program prepares individuals to be knowledgeable about and prepared to accept positions related to:

         1) scholarly inquiry and discourse in mathematics education,

         2) preparation of K-12 mathematics teachers,

         3) instruction and development issues in K-16 mathematics, and

         4) leadership positions in mathematics education.

 

Programs at each level build upon the preparation found in the mathematics education programs of the previous level. The MasterŐs degree program is built upon and assumes a strong preparation in mathematics and mathematics education at the undergraduate level. The design of the Ph.D. program, in turn, assumes the preparation defined in the MasterŐs degree program.

 

IMPORTANT PLACES & PEOPLE

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Purdue University College of Education
Beering Hall of Liberal Arts and Education (BRNG), Room 4108
100 N. University St.
West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2098 USA

Voice: (765) 494-9172     Fax: (765) 496-1622
Email:
edci@purdue.edu  

         http://www.edci.purdue.edu/

 

Office of Graduate Studies – College of Education

BRNG 3229
Purdue University
100 N University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098
Voice: (765) 494-2345     Fax: (765) 496-9449
Email:
education-gradoffice@purdue.edu

         http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/index.html

 

Mathematics Education Program Area – Includes current faculty and requirements

         http://www.edci.purdue.edu/mathematics_education/index.html

 

 

Office of Professional Preparation & Licensure

BRNG 3229
100 N. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098
Main Office: (765) 494-2345
Fax: (765) 494-0587
  

http://www.teach.purdue.edu/

 

Secondary Mathematics Education -  http://www.admissions.purdue.edu/majors/majors_details.php?MjrCd=MATHED

 

Elementary Education - http://www.admissions.purdue.edu/majors/majors_details.php?MjrCd=ELEDU

 

Other Resources

 

BursarŐs Office & Student Accounts: http://www.purdue.edu/bursar/

RegistrarŐs Office: http://www.purdue.edu/registrar/

Purdue Libraries: http://www.lib.purdue.edu/           

College of Ed. Technology Resource Center (TRC):  http://www.trc.purdue.edu/  

Office of International Students and Scholars: http://www.iss.purdue.edu/

 

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ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

Check the COE Graduate Handbook links below for full details on admissions at Purdue.  A summary of some key details for Mathematics Education programs are provided below.

ADMISSIONS WEBLINKS

á       Re-Entry Application

 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

Applicants must meet the following baseline requirements:

á  A Bachelor's degree (for M.S. study) or a Master's degree (for Ph.D. study) from an accredited college or university

á  A 3.0/4.0 or "B" grade point average (GPA)

á  A Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score that is less than 5 years old is required for all Ph.D. applicants, all international applicants, and for M.S. applicants who have less than a 3.2/4.0 GPA from their most recent degree. Verbal and quantitative scores should total 1000 or more; a verbal score of at least 500 is strongly preferred.

á  If applicable, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. Score must be less than 2 years old with minimum score 213 computer test, or 77 Internet test, with minimum scores of speaking, 18; writing18; listening,14; and reading, 19;  IELTS must have minimum score of 6.5; PTE Academic test must have minimum score of 58

Applications are accepted and reviewed year round, however Ph.D. applications received by January 15 (for summer or fall admission) or September 15 (for spring admission) are given higher priority and can be recommended for fellowship funding.

 

An applicantŐs academic record, GRE scores, recommendations, and personal statement are considered jointly in making admission decisions. Personal statements should include information about experiences in mathematics education but should also include career goals and why the applicant feels that the Purdue graduate program is a good fit for their experiences and career path.

 

As applicants to the program are reviewed, faculty consider the applicantŐs background and interests in relation to faculty expertise. Upon recommendation of the graduate faculty to accept an applicant into the program, one faculty member agrees to be the studentŐs initial advisor/chair.  The recommendation for acceptance must pass a final approval by the University Graduate School.  Applicants will then be informed of the status of their application by the Graduate Office and the Mathematics Education Graduate Program Coordinator.

 

For full details and admission forms, including information for International students see the College of EducationŐs Office of Graduate Studies web link:

http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/facultyhandbook/admissions/index.html

SCHOOL-BASED EXPERIENCES AND TEACHER LICENSURE

Many students pursuing graduate degrees in Mathematics Education are also interested in gaining teaching experience in K-12 settings and/or fulfilling requirements for an Indiana teaching license. Students are not required to pursue licensure as part of their graduate program, it is a personal choice, but one that may have financial benefits if one chooses to teach in Indiana public schools. In addition, many universities desire to hire mathematics education faculty that are fully licensed and have teaching experience in K-12 settings.

 

If interested in an initial licensure:

á       Contact the Office of Professional Preparation and Licensure to request an official evaluation by calling: (765) 494-5486, or visit: Steven C. Beering Hall of Liberal Arts & Education, Room 3229 (3rd Floor).

á       Submit the following materials to the College of Education Office of Graduate Studies, 100 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098:

o   Photocopy of official transcript evaluation from the Office of Professional Preparation & Licensure, Beering Hall, Room 3229, (765) 494-5486

o   An official transcript of grades from all universities attended.

o   500-word goal statement if applying to Science Education (Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Earth Space Science Education, Physics Education, Science Education) or to English Language Learning.

For more Teacher License instructions visit http://www.teach.purdue.edu/licensure/index.html

 

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS WHO WISH TO TAKE GRADUATE COURSES AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
 

Teachers or learners who are not part of a graduate program can still take our graduate courses at Purdue.  To do so, you would need to be admitted as a post-bacc, which is usually a quick process.  If you have been admitted and taken a Purdue course within the last 3 sessions (spring , summer, or fall), you still have eligibility to register.  If not, follow the directions on the website below to ŇapplyÓ as a post-bacc student.  There is no fee for the admission application for post-baccs.

 

If the course is being offered through the College of Education, individuals should apply through the Graduate School at  https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/ApplicantConnectLogin.asp?id=purduegrad .  Create an account and chose the option to apply as Postbaccalaureate (Non-degree). The information is also available on the COE website at http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/degrees_programs/non_degree_prog.html.   If the course is being offered through Continuing Ed, you will still need to be admitted to the Graduate School, but you should check with that office to see how they handle admissions.

 

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FINANCIAL AID

The following opportunities are by no means exhaustive. Graduate students are encouraged to discuss opportunities with their advisor and to seek a variety of outlets for financial aid.

 

INTERNAL

1.        Teaching and Research Assistantships

Assistantships (10-20 hrs. per week) may be available in Mathematics Education through a variety of venues. Some students are hired as Teaching Assistants (TAs) in the department to teach undergraduate courses such as EDCI 36400, EDCI 42500, EDCI 42600, EDCI 49800, and to supervise middle and high school mathematics student teachers. Some students are also hired as Research Assistants (RAs) to work on research projects with faculty. Most RA positions are funded through grant sources that are only available for the duration of a particular grant. The salary range for positions varies and depends on the funding source.

á     Interested students can complete an application for an assistantship through the Department Secretary. Download the C&I description of assistantships and assistantship application from the Funding site (http://www.edci.purdue.edu/grad_studies/funding.html) and complete and return as directed on the application with a copy of your resume. You must be admitted to the Purdue Graduate School before you will be offered an assistantship.

á     The Mathematics Department also hires some TAs from outside of their department to teach mathematics courses.  Graduate students may apply to participate in a screening in January or August to be considered for a teaching assistantship in the Math Department.  See the guidelines and application information at: http://www.math.purdue.edu/jobs/ta/

2.        Opportunities outside of the department.

á     Libraries (http://www.lib.purdue.edu/about/employment ) and

á     Residence Halls (http://www.housing.purdue.edu/ ) and Student Services hire graduate students as administrative/professional staff.

3.        Fellowships available through the College of Education

There are a small number of fellowships available through the College of Ed. for which MasterŐs and Doctoral students can be nominated. Fellowship recipients must be registered as full-time students for each session in which they receive a stipend, including summer sessions (Purdue considers full-time status to be a minimum of 8 credit hours in each of the Fall and Spring sessions and 6 credit hours during the Summer session).  Students must maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA during their fellowship tenure. Please refer to the Graduate School website and Fellows Manual for full details: https://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/funding/

 

Fellowships that Math Education graduate students are typically eligible for are listed below. Note that in all of these cases, students do not apply directly for the fellowship but are nominated by their graduate faculty. To receive full consideration for any of these fellowships, graduate students must submit completed admission application materials by January 15th. 

 

á                   The Frederick N. Andrews Fellowship. The Andrews Fellowships are for the recruitment of outstanding Ph.D.-track students to graduate programs at Purdue University. Each fellowship provides a four-year award package to the fellow, which includes two years of stipend support from the Graduate School and two additional years of funding support from the graduate program. The Andrews Fellowship also provides tuition coverage and a medical insurance supplement.  Students do not apply directly for the Andrews Fellowship. Selection of the recipients is conducted by the graduate faculty that administers the graduate program to which the student was admitted. At a minimum, the selection process considers the studentsŐ academic and scholarly achievements and abilities, based on admission application materials requested by the graduate program. 

 

á                   Ross Fellowships. The Ross Fellowships are for the recruitment of outstanding, Ph.D.-track students to graduate programs at Purdue University. Each fellowship provides a four-year package to the fellow, which includes one-year of support from the Graduate School and a commitment by the graduate program of three additional years of support. The additional support is usually in the form of teaching or research assistantships or a combination of both. The Ross Fellowship also provides tuition coverage and a medical insurance supplement. Students do not apply directly for the Ross Fellowship. Selection of the recipients is conducted by the graduate faculty that administers the graduate program to which the student was admitted.

 

NOTE:  The difference between the Andrews and Ross is that the Graduate School funds the Andrews for two years and the Ross for just one year.  The department provides funding for the remaining years of both fellowships/assistantships.  During the Graduate School funded years the student is responsible to the department for 25% -- teaching one section of a multi-section course or 10 hours of research.  During this time they would work with their advisor either on developing their own research agenda or participating with the advisor on one or more of the advisorŐs research projects for the other 25%.  When the department begins providing all the funding, the student is responsible to the department for the entire 50% – so two sections or 20 hours per week.  So the Andrews gives the student one more year to work on research for 25%.  Both provide 50% funding during the summer for the student to work on their research agenda with their advisor.

The C&I department procedures for offering the fellowships is that our Awards committee rank orders the nominations.  The top ranked candidate is offered the Andrews and the next are offered Ross.  If the person offered the Andrews declines the offer then it would be offered to the next highest ranked person – who would have already been offered a Ross.  That personŐs Ross would then be offered to the next person on the list.  So by accepting the Ross you do not exclude yourself from being offered the Andrews if it would become available. You cannot hold both fellowships at the same time. 

 

á                   Purdue Doctoral Fellowship. The Purdue Doctoral Fellowships support the recruitment of outstanding Ph.D.-track students who will enhance the diversity of the graduate student body in graduate programs at Purdue through their diverse backgrounds, views and experiences. Each fellowship provides a four-year award package to the fellow, which includes two years of stipend support from the Graduate School and two additional years of support from the graduate program. The Purdue Doctoral Fellowship, whether administered as a fellowship or as an assistantship, also provides tuition coverage and a medical insurance supplement. Students do not apply directly for the Purdue Doctoral Fellowship. Selection of the recipients is conducted by the graduate faculty that administers the graduate program to which the student was admitted. To receive full consideration, graduate students must submit completed Graduate School admission application materials, including a diversity essay, by January 15th. The diversity essay should be 500 words or less responding to the statement: Describe your leadership, work experience, service experience, or other significant involvement with racial, ethnic, socio-economic, or educational communities that have traditionally been underrepresented in higher education, and how these experiences would promote a diversity of views, experiences, and ideas in the pursuit of research, scholarship, and creative excellence.  Recipients of Purdue Doctoral Fellowships must have graduated from an accredited U.S. high school; be admitted to Purdue as Ph.D.- track students in a degree-granting graduate program; demonstrate superior academic achievement and scholarly abilities through the views, experiences and backgrounds, as communicated in the diversity essay; and demonstrate their ability to contribute to the diversity of the graduate student body.

 

á                   David M. Knox Fellowships (for MasterŐs students). The David M. Knox Fellowships are awarded to masters-seeking students to enhance the diversity of the graduate student body through the recruitment of students with diverse backgrounds, views and experiences. The Knox Fellowship commits a two-year award package to the fellows, which includes one year of stipend support from the Graduate School and one additional year of funding support from the graduate program. Tuition and fee coverage and a medical insurance supplement are also provided. The nomination must include: the studentŐs curriculum vitae (use as the cover sheet for the application), statement of purpose, diversity essay, letters of recommendation and transcripts and submit as one pdf file. To receive full consideration, graduate students must submit completed Graduate School admission application materials, including a diversity essay, by January 15th. The diversity essay should be 500 words or less, responding to the statement: Describe your leadership, work experience, service experience, or other significant involvement with racial, ethnic, socio-economic, or educational communities that have traditionally been underrepresented in higher education, and how these experiences would promote a diversity of views, experiences, and ideas in the pursuit of research, scholarship, and creative excellence. Recipients of Knox Fellowships must have graduated from an accredited U.S. high school, be admitted to Purdue in a degree- granting graduate program, and, at a minimum, must demonstrate superior academic achievement and scholarly abilities, enhancing the graduate student body through a diversity of backgrounds, views and experiences.

 

á                   Graduate School Summer Research Grants. Graduate School Summer Research Grants provide two months of thesis research support for pre-doctoral students who have been exclusively teaching during both of the preceding academic semesters. The eligibility criteria for the Summer Research Grant are as follows:

o  Doctoral student

o  0.50 FTE Teaching Assistant for both preceding semesters,

o  No Research, Fellowship or Administrative/Professional Appointment,

o  GPA of 3.0 or higher.

The Graduate School identifies eligible students and nominations are handled through the departments each spring semester.

 

á      PRF Grants. The PRF Research Grants are one-year awards made by the Office of the Vice President for Research to assist faculty who supervise Ph.D. research in the development of new or the continuation of ongoing research projects by providing support for a half-time (0.50FTE) PRF Research Assistantship.PRF Research Grants provide an annual salary (comparable to Purdue's current minimum half-time graduate salary established by the Graduate School) and funds to cover graduate student medical insurance and fringe benefits. In addition, the student supported on the grant receives a remission of all tuition and fees except for the applicable graduate appointment fee, repair and rehabilitation fee, and any discipline specific differential fees. Only Purdue University graduate students in good standing (minimum GPA = 3.0) working for the Ph.D. degree may be appointed as PRF Research Assistants. The student must have satisfied all the requirements of the graduate program to be recognized as a Ph.D. student (e.g. Ph.D. program qualifying requirements, etc, as appropriate) and be actively working on their Ph.D. research (e.g. registered for credit in a departmental 699 graduate research course). Substitution of one eligible Ph.D. graduate student for another eligible Ph.D. graduate student may occur at any time at the discretion of the faculty grant recipient, with the consent of their department head.

EXTERNAL (for Teachers and teaching license)

1.        Scholarships for full-time teachers from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

NCTM provides opportunities for several different types of grants or scholarships.  Please see http://www.nctm.org/Grants/ for details and application process.

2.        Knowles Science Teaching Foundation

KSTF annually funds science and mathematics Teaching Fellows. Knowles Fellows are young men and women who have received a bachelor's or advanced degree in science, engineering or mathematics and are committed to teaching high school science and/or mathematics in U.S. schools. The fellowship supports them professionally and financially for up to five years through a teacher preparation program to eligibility for tenure. Fellows who were full-time students received up to $10,000 in annual tuition assistance and a monthly stipend while they were working toward a teaching credential. Full-time teachers are eligible for small materials grants and support for a mentor-teacher relationship. All fellows receive funding for summer professional development and summer living stipends. KSTF also supports membership in a professional organization and travel to professional meetings. Application deadline is typically mid-January for awards that will begin in the summer. See website for details at http://kstf.org/fellowships/

3.        Noyce Education Teaching Scholars

The Noyce Program is a scholarship program that attracts students in STEM majors and places them in a high-need area to teach a math or science subject.  The Noyce Program provides $15,000 of support per year and gives one-on-one mentoring during your remaining years of school along with your first years of teaching. Details and applications can be found at http://noyce.education.purdue.edu/

4.        TEACH Grant    

    See details at http://www.teach.purdue.edu/admissions/financial_aid.html

5.        Woodrow Wilson: STEM Goes Rural

      See details at http://www.purdue.edu/stemgoesrural/

 

SUPPORT FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH

1.        The Bilsland Dissertation Fellowship 

This is a Purdue University fellowship that provides support to outstanding Ph.D. candidates in their final year of doctoral degree completion. Bilsland Fellows are expected to devote full-time effort to the completion of all doctoral degree requirements to receive the doctoral degree at the conclusion of the fellowship tenure. Students do not apply directly for the Bilsland Fellowship, but are nominated and selected by members of the graduate faculty in the college or school. At a minimum, the selection process considers the studentsŐ academic and scholarly achievements and the promise of degree attainment at the conclusion of the fellowship of the fellowship tenure. 

Nomination Form

Rubric

Past Winners

2.        NAED/Spencer Foundation.

The foundation offers a competitive Dissertation Fellowship Program for Ph.D. students, which seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $25,000 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world. Applications are generally due in early November for work that can begin the next June. See http://www.naeducation.org/NAED_080200.htm for application details.

3.        Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowships.

Annual awards of approximately 20 dissertation fellowships worth $21,000. The dissertation fellowships provide one year of support for individuals working to complete a dissertation leading to a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) degree. Dissertation fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Research Council (NRC) on behalf of the Ford Foundation. The awards will be made to individuals who, in the judgment of the review panels, have demonstrated superior academic achievement, are committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level, show promise of future achievement as scholars and teachers, and are well prepared to use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students. Application deadline is typically early November. See the website for details http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/FordFellowships/PGA_047959.

4.        AERA Dissertation Grants

http://www.aera.net/ProfessionalOpportunitiesFunding/FundingOpportunities/AERAGrantsProgram/DissertationGrants/tabid/12812/Default.aspx

 

TRAVEL GRANTS

5.        College of Education DeanŐs Graduate Student Travel Support

Find details and updated application form at:

http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/currentSt/gradstd_travel_grants.html

Partial support is available for graduate students who have authored or co-authored an accepted paper that will be presented at a national or international conference. Up to $150 per student, per fiscal year (July 1 – May 31) may be awarded to reimburse students for airfare and/or lodging expenses incurred. Students are encouraged to apply early in the fiscal year, as awards are limited. Departmental financial support of student applications is encouraged. In order to be eligible to apply, you must be currently enrolled in a graduate program in the College of Education. The following Processes must be completed at least one month prior to travel.

á       Complete the Application

á       Submit completed form and a hard copy of the national or international conference acceptance letter to the COE Graduate Office, BRNG 6104.

á       Use Concur to submit a request for travel form.

AWARDS

For updates see http://www.education.purdue.edu/about_us/awards/Graduate_Awards.html

 

1.     Mike Keedy Scholarship in Mathematics and Education ($1000 one-time award)

 

The Keedy Scholarship was established to recognize and provide support for students who demonstrate promise in the field of mathematics education. Doctoral level graduate students are considered who meet the following criteria:

GPA of 3.5 or above for courses taken in the current program

Completion of at least one semester in the doctoral program

 

The specific criteria for this award are as follows:

Demonstrates potential for excellence in at least one of the two categories

Research

Teacher Education

Participates in the mathematics education community (e.g. attend group meetings, share ideas, designs, and findings of research projects, etc.)

Campus-wide (e.g. College of Education activities)

Local (e.g. Give workshops locally or presents at state conferences)

Regional (e.g. Present at regional meetings or conferences)

National (e.g. Present at national conferences)

 

Students considered for the award: 

á       All doctoral students in mathematics education who are on the Keedy Candidate list generated by the graduate school are considered by the mathematics education faculty.

 

The selection process utilized:

á       Excellence in either research or teacher education is weighed equally with contributions to the mathematics education community. Program area faculty members vote on viable candidates (1-3 per year), write a rationale for each proposed recipient of the award, and submit them in rank-order to the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Education. Students may receive the award in multiple years.

 

Due Date:

á       Keedy award nominations are due at the beginning of March.  Nominations are made by Math Education faculty. Awardees are presented with the award at the last College of Education faculty meeting of the Spring semester.

 

2.    Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award

Description - This award recognizes graduate teaching assistants for their current teaching efforts at the graduate and undergraduate level. Nominations are handled at the department level. Each department forwards one nominee to the Dean's Office and the College of Education Awards Committee selects the winner.

Nomination

Rubric

Past Winners

3.    Mary Kay Sommers Dissertation Award

This award recognizes an outstanding doctoral dissertation. Nominations are handled at the department level. Each department forwards one nominee to the Dean's Office and the College of Education Awards Committee selects the winner.

Nomination

Rubric

Past Winners

4.    Dean's Doctoral Scholarship

This award is given to an outstanding doctoral student in the College of Education who is currently involved in completing dissertation research. To be eligible you must show potential for or have demonstrated national leadership with excellence in discovery, learning, and/or engagement.

Nomination

Rubric

Past Winners

5.    CETA Award for Excellence in Teaching

This award is given by the Committee on the Education of Teaching Assistants (CETA) and the Office of the Provost. Students are nominated by departments. Each winner receives a plaque. The recipients then become eligible to receive the Graduate School Excellence in Teaching Award.

Website

Past Winners

6.     Graduate School Excellence in Teaching Award

Recipients of the Graduate School Excellence in Teaching Award are from nominations by departments of previous CETA Award winners, including current year inductees. Applicants must be registered as full-time graduate students during the semester in which applications are due. Each student receives a plaque and a $500 monetary award. This is the highest award presented by the University to recognize graduate student teachers.

7.     MAGS Distinguished Master's Thesis Award

This award is given by the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) to recognize and reward distinguished scholarship and research at the master's level. Each institution may submit one nomination with endorsement of the Dean of the Graduate School. The recipient of the award will receive a $750 honorarium and the institution will receive up to $750 for the winners travel expenses to attend the Annual Meeting in April.

 

Website

 

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LIFE AS A GRADUATE STUDENT

Transitioning to life as a graduate student can be a difficult process. Acclimating back to academic life, meeting new colleagues, making new friends, and adjusting to life in a new city are just some of the challenges.  The graduate school has a useful resource: Tips for Graduate Living http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~pgsg/files/projects/gradtips.pdf that includes information about University resources, and a lot of information on things to do for fun in Lafayette.

GRADUATE STUDENT COMMUNITIES

A large part of the graduate student experience is becoming a member in an academic community. Students should take full advantage of PurdueŐs academic community by joining formal student and professional communities, as well as attending informal and social gatherings with faculty and other graduate students. Having a strong support group of colleagues can make the graduate experience more enjoyable and less stressful.

 

There are many opportunities at Purdue to join organizations for graduate students. These can provide both academic and social experiences. The following is a link to some common centers and organizations:

á  Purdue Graduate Student Government http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~pgsg/

á  Graduate Student Education Council  http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~gsec/

á  Curriculum and Instruction Graduate Student Association http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~cigsa/

USEFUL LINKS

Calendars                  http://calendar.purdue.edu/

Campus Maps                     http://www.purdue.edu/campus_map/

Directory                             https://www.itap.purdue.edu/directory/

Purdue Acronyms               http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/BS/Acronyms/list.cfm

Student Success Guide      http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/currentSt/ten_things.html

Health/Counseling            http://www.purdue.edu/caps/

Ombudsman                  https://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/student/ombuds/index.html

Tips for working with an Advisor      http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/pdf_doc/Tips_WorkingWithAdv.pdf

 

RESOURCES

6.        For Writing Help

á  OWL at Purdue: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

á  OWL Writing Lab:  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/writinglab/

á  Verb Tenses in Academic Writing: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/verb-tenses/

á  Writing a Literature review

o    http://www.academiccoachingandwriting.org/dissertation-doctor/resources/writing-a-literature-review/

7.        For English-Language Learners

á  Free English classes through the International Center: http://www.intlctr.org/programs/language-programs/english-language

á  Oral English Proficiency Program: http://www.purdue.edu/oepp/

á  Community ESL resources: http://www.purdue.edu/oepp/resources/community.html

á  Free ESL Lessons – Lafayette Adult Resource Academy (LARA) http://www.laralafayette.org/

8.        For Graduate Life

á  www.theprofessorisin.com

á  Piled Higher and Deeper:  http://phdcomics.com/comics.php

9.        For Research

á  IRB: https://www.irb.purdue.edu/

á  Math Ed Journal Descriptions: http://mathedjournals.wikispaces.com/

á  NVivo: http://www.itap.purdue.edu/shopping/software/product/nvivo/

á  Endnote Web: http://social.education.purdue.edu/edit/2011/01/endnote-web-cite-while-you-write/

á  Math Education Online Resources: http://www.istl.org/03-summer/internet.html

10.    For Mentoring

á  http://www.facultydiversity.org/

o    The National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity is an independent professional development, training, and mentoring community of over 40,000 graduate students, post- doctoral fellows, and faculty members dedicated to supporting academics in making successful transitions throughout their careers.  The president and CEO of the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity, Dr. Kerry Ann Rockquemore, is highly regarded in the area of faculty development. Through PurdueŐs institutional membership, our faculty, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students have access to these resources. Follow the steps below to subscribe. There is no cost. Print the attached flyer for convenient reference and contact information.

1.             Go to the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity website http://www.facultydiversity.org/

2.             Select the ŇBecome a MemberÓ tab and choose ŇIndividual MembershipÓ

3.             On the Individual Membership page select ŇJoin NowÓ

4.             On the ŇSelect Your Member TypeÓ page, select ŇInstitutional Sub-AccountÓ

5.             On the ŇSelect a UsernameÓ page use your institution-issued e-mail address in the Username box

6.             Complete the registration process

7.             You will receive a welcome e-mail within 24 business hours confirming that your account is now active and you can begin fully using your new NCFDD membership

 

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following table summarizes the major mathematics education related professional organizations along with their publications and conferences. Students should familiarize themselves with the websites of these organizations. In the beginning stages of doctoral work, students should plan on attending local conferences or national conferences when close to Purdue. As students progress in their work, they should consider submitting posters and individual papers to conferences of interest.

 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION RELATED PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Organization Name

Website

Affiliated Journals

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

www.nctm.org

Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School

Teaching Children Mathematics

Mathematics Teacher

Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (JRME)

Indiana Council of Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM)

http://www.indianamath.org/

 

Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (RUME)

www.rume.org

Online Proceedings

Mathematical Association of America (MAA) (RUME is a SIGMAA of MAA)

www.maa.org

American Mathematical Monthly

Mathematics Magazine

College Mathematics Journal

MAA Focus

Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)

www.amte.net

Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE)

Mathematics Teacher Educator

School Science and Mathematics Association (SSMA)

www.ssma.org

School Science and Mathematics Journal

Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education

http://site.aace.org

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (JTATE)

Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE)

American Educational Research Association (AERA)

www.aera.net

American Educational Research Journal (AERJ)

Educational Researcher

Review of Educational Research

Review of Research in Education

International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME)

www.igpme.org

Online proceedings and archived in ERIC (www.eric.gov)

Psychology of Mathematics Education-North American Chapter (PME-NA)

www.pmena.org

Online Proceedings and archived in ERIC (www.eric.gov)

International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI)             

  á International Congress on  

    Mathematics Education (ICME)              

 

www.mathunion.org/ICMI/

ICMI Bulletin á

ICME online proceedings

ICMI-studies online proceedings

Kluwer Volumes

International Society of the Learning Sciences

https://isls.org/

Journal of the Learning Sciences

International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

Supported Collaborative Learning

 

 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CONFERENCES

It is important to expand your knowledge of research in the field by attending and presenting at academic conferences.  Conferences are also a great venue for meeting the researchers whose work you are reading, other graduate students (i.e., your immediate peers in the field), and faculty or students from schools that you may wish to apply to in the future.  Ph.D. students are expected to attend conferences whenever possible and to present research at least once before graduation (conferences are an excellent venue for getting outside feedback on your own research). Ph.D. students should also present posters at the Annual Graduate Student Education Research Symposium held on PurdueŐs campus in March. 

 

A sample of important mathematics education conferences are listed below: 

1.        FALL CONFERENCES

á      Psychology of Mathematics Education – North America (PME-NA)

o   http://www.pmena.org/

o   Focuses on furthering a deeper and better understanding of the psychological aspects of teaching and learning mathematics and the implications thereof.

o   Conference typically takes place in October or November

o   Proposals typically due at the beginning of February

á      Indiana Council of Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM)

o   http://www.indianamath.org/

o   Yearly conference for Indiana teachers. 

o   Great opportunity to present to practitioners

o   Proposals typically due in the summer

á      Radical Math: Creating Balance in an Unjust World

o   October conference

o   http://creatingbalanceconference.org/

2.        SPRING CONFERENCES

á      Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)

o   http://www.amte.net/

o   Focuses on the improvement of mathematics teacher education and research devoted to the pre-service education and professional development of K-12 teachers of mathematics.

o   Typically takes place at the end of January or beginning of February

o   Proposals are usually due in late spring

á      Research in Undergraduate Mathematics (RUME)

o   http://www.rume.org/

o   Special interest group of Mathematical Association of America (MAA).

o   Focuses on research conducted at the collegiate level

o   Typically takes place in late February

o   Proposals due in October

á      National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

o   http://www.nctm.org/Conferences-and-Professional-Development/Annual-Meeting-and-Exposition/

o   Research Pre-session annually brings researchers together to examine and discuss current issues in mathematics education;

o   Annual Meeting is attended by K-12 teachers from across the US and includes the latest strategies in math education, with workshops from exhibitors, hands-on activities with giveaways, and sessions from some the world's leading experts.

o   Occurs in April (3 days of Research Pre-session + 5 day Regular session)

o   Proposals are usually due in May (teacher session) & August (Pre-session)

á      National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM)

o   http://www.mathedleadership.org/

o   Typically offered in the same place and time as the NCTM Pre-session

o   Proposals are usually due in June

á      American Educational Research Association (AERA)

o   http://www.aera.net/

o   AERA is a prominent international professional organization, with the primary goal of advancing educational research and its practical application. The broad range of disciplines represented by the membership includes education, psychology, statistics, sociology, history, economics, philosophy, anthropology, and political science. 

o   Special Interest Group – Research in Mathematics Education (SIG-RME)

o   Typically takes place in April

o   Proposals are usually due in July

á      Annual Graduate Student Education Research Symposium - Purdue University

o   A research symposium for graduate students in education-related degree programs from across the Purdue campus.

o   Typically held in March

o   Watch for emails in early Spring announcing the symposium. Students must sign up in advance.

3.        INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES

á      International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME)

o   http://igpme.org/

o   Proposals due in early January

o   Typically held in July

á      International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME)

o   http://www.mathunion.org/icmi/home/

o   Held every four years – typically in July

 

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ADVISING/COMMITTEES

ADVISORS

 

Each MasterŐs and Ph.D. student will initially be assigned a faculty member in Mathematics Education to help him or her develop a preliminary plan of course work and to organize a graduate advisory committee. The initial advisor helps the student develop a plan of graduate study that meets the requirements of the graduate program and ensures that no student is left without a faculty member to chair his or her thesis. However, as students progress through the program and their research interests become more refined and focused, they are welcome to switch advisors/chairs and build a committee appropriate to their research interests. At times, students switch advisors/chairs because of their TA or RA positions and the opportunity to complete a thesis/dissertation focused around their assistantship work.

 

á           Students are expected to meet with their advisor regularly – at least twice a semester (likely more often during particular times in the program).  Once a committee has been formed, students should periodically email or meet with the members to keep them apprised of progress in the program and any problems that arise.  Initiating these meetings and conversations is the responsibility of the graduate student.

 

á           In meetings with advisors, students should:

 

á  discuss plans for courses,

á  develop/revise a plan of work and timeline for completion of the degree,

á  discuss funding opportunities,

á  discuss progress towards the degree

á  discuss professional goals and opportunities for gaining experiences to be competitive for the job market.

á  discuss licensure options for public school teaching

 

á           Students are expected to document their meetings with faculty by taking accurate notes. In particular, these notes should summarize main topics of discussion, clarify any tasks to be completed by the student and/or faculty member, and clearly list the agreed-upon deadlines for such tasks. A copy of these notes should be e-mailed to the faculty member within a few days of the meeting. 

 

á           Your advisor is here to help you – to help keep you on track, to help keep you from taking on too much work, and to help you find and choose the right opportunities in your program.   It is important to talk to you advisor before making any major decisions about adding to your course load, taking on new jobs or project, etc.  The following are some of the roles of an advisor:

 

 

AN ADVISOR:

 

á  Should be committed to the education and training of the graduate student as a future member of the research or academic community.

á  Should meet one-on-one with the student on a regular basis. 

á  Should provide timely feedback on the studentŐs work to facilitate ongoing progress on the thesis.

á  Should help the graduate student to select a thesis committee.

á  Should provide a learning environment for his/her graduate student that is intellectually stimulating and supportive.

á  Should consistently enforce standards of rigor and academic conduct that model the best practices in research and scholarship in their discipline for the graduate student.

á  Has the right and responsibility to delay the thesis defense project is not deemed ready by the thesis advisor until the student has revised the thesis to meet the advisorŐs standards.

á  Should make sure that the student has satisfied all of the requirements of the department and the graduate college

á  Should provide input on the intellectual appropriateness of the proposed activities, the reasonableness of project scope, acquisition of necessary resources and expertise, necessary laboratory or computer facilities, etc.;

á  Should establish key academic milestones and communicate these to the student and appropriately evaluate the student on meeting these milestones.

á  Represents the broad interests of the institution with respect to high standards of scholarly performance;

á  Works with students to set priorities and to find a balance between doing research, reading, writing, satisfying ta and ra duties, publishing, and coursework.

á  Should be aware of both long-term and short-term needs and help the student identify ways that the two of you -- as a team -- can meet these goals.

á  Advises the student on the criteria for a successful qualifying exam, thesis proposal, and dissertation and helps prepare the student for a future research career.

 

 

COMMITTEE MEMBERS: 

 

á           In addition to your advisor, you will eventually form a Graduate Committee.  This will include other faculty whose role is to support you in your graduate work in various ways.  For example, you may chose one committee member who specializes in the particular methodology you are using in your research and can help you with this, while another member may have a special focus on content that is similar to yours.

á           Requirements:

¤ MASTERŐS STUDENTS (Thesis or Non-Thesis) will typically have only 3 committee members.

¤ PH.D STUDENTS can have 3 committee members for the Preliminary Exam stage of the Program. A fourth member must be added for the Portfolio and Final Dissertation Defense.

¤ All committees must have a minimum of 3 members of whom 51% must be regular Purdue Faculty with Graduate School certification. {GS}

¤ The committee chair (advisor) or at least one co-chair must be from the C&I program area where the student is admitted (I.e, from Math Education). It is strongly recommended that at least 1 committee member be selected from the C&I faculty.

¤ Members of the committee need not be faculty with whom you have taken coursework

¤ There are no restrictions on inviting external faculty or experts to be committee members provided all other restrictions are met. Students should request special graduate faculty certification early, since the process may take time and requires approval by the Head. Certification involves the individualŐs CV, description of expertise, and current contact information.

¤ There are no restrictions on the maximum number of faculty permitted on your committee.

¤ Note: Changes to committee members and coursework can be made to the initial approved plan if needed. If there have been changes to courses or committee members after the Plan of Study has been submitted to the Graduate School, you must use a Request for Change to the Plan of Study (G.S. Form 13), which must be signed by you and approved by your major professor, the head of the graduate program, and the school dean (if requested by the school).

 

 

 

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GRADUATE COMPETENCIES

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction requires that all graduate students demonstrate general graduate competencies, including the ability to: synthesize knowledge, create knowledge, communicate knowledge, think critically and reflectively, engage in professional development, and participate actively in their profession:

C&I General Graduate Competencies

1.     Synthesize Knowledge - The graduate will read and synthesize educational literature related to his/her discipline; describe fundamental theories of human learning; and apply knowledge of human learning, diversity, and effective pedagogy to the solution of practical problems in his/her discipline.

2.     Create Knowledge - The graduate will describe common research methods in his/her discipline, read and evaluate educational research, adhere to ethical standards for the responsible conduct of research, and apply research findings to the solution of practical problems in his/her discipline.

3.     Communicate Knowledge - The graduate will communicate effectively in oral and written formats including the ability to communicate content from his/her discipline through the design and delivery of effective teaching/learning activities that integrate content and pedagogy, adapt instruction and support services to the needs of diverse learners, and assess appropriately learning outcomes.

4.     Think Critically and Reflectively - The graduate will develop a personal vision of inclusive educational practice, identify the relationship of his/her discipline to the broader field of education, and critically evaluate theory and practice.

5.     Engage in Professional Development - The graduate will demonstrate the disposition for life-long learning and continuous professional development.

6.     Participate Actively in Their Profession - The graduate will identify communities of practice within his/her discipline and participate within these communities according to the ethical standards of the discipline.

In addition, we encourage a focus on two special areas of Diversity and Technology. Each graduate program has developed specific guidelines for how graduate students are to demonstrate these competencies and any program-specific competencies. In Math Education, Ph.D. students demonstrate these competencies through their Annual Self-Review.  A studentŐs graduate committee must be able to assert that the student has met all competencies by the end of their program.  This annual review provides documentation for the committee to use as evidence of meeting the standards. Students will use work from classes, conferences, research and teaching experiences, and work on their dissertation as evidence for meeting the competencies.

MasterŐs students demonstrate all competencies through their Annual Review and required graduate portfolio (see details below).  Students will use work from classes, conferences, and research and teaching experiences as artifacts/evidence for meeting the competencies.

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DISMISSAL POLICY

According to PurdueŐs Graduate School Policies and Procedures Manual, each Ňstudent's progress should be reviewed each session by the student's departmentÉ Should the student fail to perform in either coursework or research on a level acceptable to the advisory committee, the departmental graduate committee, or the dean of the Graduate School, he or she may be asked to discontinue graduate study at PurdueÓ (p. VI-1).

A graduate student may be dismissed from graduate study in the College of Education, based on Graduate School and departmental policies, in instances where the student fails to:

1.       Earn satisfactory course grades and/or maintain a satisfactory grade index;

2.       Make satisfactory progress, including progress in research, and complete the program in a timely fashion;

3.       Pass graduate preliminary or final examinations; or

4.       Adhere to standards of academic honesty, research integrity, and student conduct.

See full details about this policy at:

http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/facultyhandbook/dismissal_policy/index.html

 

Additional Rules to Know and Consider:

 

á           A student has five years from the date they pass Prelims to successfully pass their final defense.  If a student exceeds the five-year limit, the student's Prelim becomes invalid and will have to be retaken. (School Policy, September 1993)

á           Degree must be completed within 5 years after passing the Final Examination. (Graduate School Policy)

á           All doctoral programs in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction must be completed no longer than eight (8) calendar years from entry to the program area.  (Department policy, approved February 2005)     

á           A program area, when doing reviews, can indicate in a letter to the student that sufficient progress needs to be made in a certain period of time, e.g. a year.  Specific expectations can be given in the letter, sent to the student and copied to the graduate office and department head. Failure to meet the expectations laid out in such a letter is grounds for dismissal.

á           Students can have up to a two-semester lapse in coursework (including fall, spring, and summer) and not have to re-apply for the program.  If they do no register for any coursework for a full year (three semesters (including summers)), then they have to re-apply to the program and be re-accepted.

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DOCTORATE (PH.D) IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

 Ph.D. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The Ph.D. program emphasizes research and requires a written dissertation for completion. The program is individualized to meet the needs of graduate students. The student must develop, with the guidance from the major professor and committee, a program that is applicable to their background and interest. The average Ph.D. program requires 3-5 years beyond a masterŐs degree. The program is comprised of coursework in four major areas:

á  Mathematics Education

á  Mathematics

á  Cognate Area

á  Research Core

I. Mathematics Education Courses (15 - 18 hours)

In mathematics education, students engage in courses that cover topics in the cognitive and cultural theories of learning and teaching mathematics, and the role of curriculum in mathematics education.

A three (3) course sequence is required that consists of:

á  EDCI 635 - Goals and Content in Mathematics Education

á  EDCI 636 - The Learning of Mathematics: Insights and Issues

á  EDCI 637 - The Teaching of Mathematics: Insights and Issues

Students should also take 6-9 hours of EDCI 620: Developing as a Math Ed. Researcher

II. Mathematics Course Work (minimum 6 hours)

All students should have appropriate course work in mathematics, statistics, educational technology, or a related field.  Students without a master's level background in mathematics may be required to take more courses in mathematics. This will be determined by the student's major professor and committee.

III. Cognate (9 hours)

Students will take three graduate courses in a self-selected cognate area. Cognate area selection should be discussed with the studentŐs major professor and advisory committee.  Possible cognate areas include: mathematics, psychology, philosophy, sociology, and technology.

 

IV. Research Core Courses (15 hours)

All doctoral students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction must complete five (5) courses from areas in research methodology and analysis before beginning their dissertation:

á  EDPS 533 - Introduction to Research in Education

á  EDCI 615 - Qualitative Research Methods in Education

á  MA 512 - Introductory Statistics

á  Advance electives in either quantitative or qualitative methods

 

DESCRIPTION OF CORE DOCTORAL COURSES

The core courses EDCI 63500, 63600, and 63700 can be taken in any order. One of these courses is offered every Fall on a three-year cycle.  EDCI 62000 is a research experience course offered every Spring semester.  The focus of this course changes each year, and students should take it 2-3 times in their doctoral program.

EDCI 63500

 COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is part of a series of three courses that form the foundation for graduate study in mathematics education. In this course, the focus is on various theories or theoretical frameworks related to mathematics curriculum. The goal of this course is to investigate the underlying nature of curriculum and the ways in which mathematics curriculum has evolved across time. This will be accomplished by reading both seminal and current research articles in which the authors examine curriculum and curricular relationships in mathematics education.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

á           Develop perspectives on and communicate various theories or theoretical frameworks related to mathematics curriculum.

á           Investigate and communicate a research-based perspective on the underlying nature of curriculum.

á           Develop and communicate a historical perspective on evolution of mathematics curriculum.

á           Synthesize seminal and current research describing curriculum and curricular relationships in mathematics education.

EDCI 63600

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is part of a series of three courses that form the foundation for graduate study in mathematics education. In this course, the focus is on various theories or theoretical frameworks for learning mathematics. The goal of this course is to investigate core ideas and beliefs that form the thinking and research efforts in the learning of mathematics. This will be accomplished by analytically reading central papers in mathematics education and related fields.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

á           Develop perspectives on and communicate orally and in writing various theories or theoretical frameworks for learning mathematics.

á           Investigate and communicate orally and in writing core ideas and beliefs that form the thinking and research efforts in the learning of mathematics.

á           Critically reflect on and synthesize seminal and current research.

EDCI 63700

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is part of a series of three courses that form the foundation for graduate study in mathematics education. In this course, the focus is on various theories or theoretical frameworks related to teaching mathematics. The goal of this course is to investigate the theoretical and empirical foundations of the research literature related to mathematics teaching, teacher education, and/or professional development. This will be accomplished by reading and analyzing research in these areas of mathematics teaching.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

á           Develop perspectives on and communicate orally and in writing various theories or theoretical frameworks related to teaching mathematics.

á           Investigate and communicate orally and in writing theoretical and empirical foundations of the research literature related to mathematics teaching, teacher education, and/or professional development.

á           Critically reflect on and synthesize seminal and current research in mathematics teaching, teacher education, and/or professional development.

EDCI 62000

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is a research course focused on selected topics in mathematics education. Typical topics considered are: (1) problem solving; (2) instructional strategies; (3) cognitive structure; (4) current curriculum; (5) current research. Students typically register for 3 credits, though only one-hour per week is allotted to course meetings (class time).  The other two hours come from work that students participate in to gain experience in research, either on a project of their own, or in collaboration with faculty or classmates.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

á           Examine, synthesize, and communicate a view of the state of mathematics education and situate oneŐs research in it.

á           Create knowledge for the field of mathematics education and communicate findings to the professional community.

á           Communicate and act upon professional feedback in the processes of designing and conducting research and writing conference proposals and research reports.

á           Report on various stages and types of research (e.g., project design, data analysisÉ)

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DOCTORAL DEGREE PLAN OF STUDY GUIDELINES (Download .pdf)

A student should discuss the plan of study with the faculty advisor/chair. To create a plan of study, access myPurdue at http://www.mypurdue.purdue.edu . On the Academic tab, there is a link to the Graduate School Plan of Study, which takes you to the Graduate Student Database.

 

The plan of study may be submitted as a ŇDraft.Ó An e-mail notification is sent to the advisory committee who may review, if desired, and indicate any changes to be made. When the plan has been completed, the student should submit it as ŇFinal.Ó At that time, electronic approval is required of the manager of the Office of Graduate Studies, advisory committee members, department head, Graduate School authorization, and Graduate School processor.

 

Please keep in mind the following policies regarding the plan of study:

á  Students must be registered (enrolled in classes) or have eligibility to enroll during the semester that the plan of study is submitted. {GS}

 

á  The plan of study must be approved by the Graduate School before scheduling the Preliminary Examination. {GS}

 

á  A minimum of 15 hours of graduate work in Education earned at Purdue and one-third (30 hours) of all course work used to satisfy degree requirements must be earned (while registered for PhD study) in continuous residency (registering during fall and spring semesters) on the Purdue campus where the degree is to be awarded. {C}

 

á  Hours of course work with an Education prefix on the plan of study must be equal to or greater than those hours completed in other departments. {C}

 

á  PhD plan of study must list any masterŐs degree course work (up to 30 credit hours from only one masterŐs degree) that is to be used toward the 90 credit hours required for the doctoral degree program. {GS}

 

á  Purdue University courses taken while in regular graduate status must be ŇCÓ or above in order to meet degree requirements. {GS}

 

á  Only transfer courses taken at another accredited university for a grade of A or B may appear on a Plan of Study. {GS}

 

á  Courses taken as non-degree, excess undergraduate credit, or transfer credit must be ŇBÓ or above. {GS}

 

á  Up to 12 credits taken while in post-baccalaureate or teacher license status (including any undergraduate excess credits) with a grade of ŇBÓ or better, may be considered for use on a plan of study for an advanced degree. If requesting more than 12 credit hours, a waiver request* must be submitted for approval. {GS}

 

á  Courses taken, as Pass/Fail or audited may NOT be used on a Plan of Study. Departmental credit for a course cannot be used. {GS}ﰖ A maximum of 18 credits will be allowed from any one semester (9 credit hours for the summer session) on a plan of study. {GS}

 

á  Course work used in completing an educational specialist program from Purdue University or any other university may not be applied to the doctoral plan of study. {GS}

 

á  Courses must be less than 5 years old to be considered for use on a plan of study for an advanced degree {D} If using courses over 5 years of age {D} or having a lapse of five years of graduate study {GS}, a waiver request* must be submitted.

 

á  Courses taken as 590/591 are limited to 15 credit hours. {D} If requesting to use more than 15 hours, a waiver request* must be submitted for approval.

 

á  A waiver request* to use 300 and 400 level course work on a plan of study may be considered by the departmentŐs graduate committee. {C} With an approved waiver, 300 and 400 level course work may not exceed six credit hours. {GS}

 

á  Thesis research hours (699) should be noted by the student in the comments section and will apply toward the number of hours needed for the degree. {GS}

 

á  Committee must have a minimum of 3 members of whom 51% must be regular Purdue Faculty with Graduate School certification. {GS}

 

á  The committee chair or at least one co-chair must be from the C&I program area where the student is admitted. It is strongly recommended that at least 1 committee member be selected from the C&I faculty. {D}

 

á  One related area must be in another program area or department. {D}

 

GS=Graduate School Policy    C=College Policy         D=Department Policy

 

*Waiver Request Form— http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/currentSt/pos.html

 

Office of Graduate Studies Purdue University

education-gradoffice@purdue.edu,

765-494-2345

DEVELOPING THE PLAN OF STUDY (Ph.D.)

Visit the following links from the COE Graduate Handbook for updated information about creating the plan of study

  Doctoral Plan Study Department of Curriculum and Instruction

á       Forming a Committee

á       Degree Title

á       Concentration

á       Checklist

á       Department Foundations and Research Requirements

Suggested/Required Courses For Research Coursework

1.

Introduction to Research in Education. This area provides an overview to a variety of research procedures that are commonly used to address important questions in education.

EDPS 533

2.

Qualitative Research I. This area provides a foundation for understanding the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings and procedures used in conducting qualitative research.

EDCI 615

3.

Introductory Statistics. This area provides a foundation for understanding and applying basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistical research design and analysis. You should consult your major professor concerning the course that is most appropriate.

STAT 501 or 511, 
PSY 600, SOC 581

4.

Advanced Elective. Courses in the three areas listed above must be followed by an advanced course in either qualitative or quantitative research methods.

Those who plan to use qualitative methods in their research should take an advanced course in data analysis and interpretation.

-or-

 

Those planning to use quantitative methods in their research should take an advanced course in statistics. An approved course in regression, multivariate, or path analysis will also satisfy this requirement. Students should consult their major professor to select the most suitable course.

EDCI 616, COM 583,
ANTH 519, 565, or 605, 
ENGL 599, SOC 609


-or-

 

STAT 502 or 512, 
PSY 601

5.

Research Seminar. This area focuses on the design and presentation (written and oral) of educational research. Seminars that focus on qualitative or quantitative studies are offered under the same course number. Students should elect the option that is most suited to their research interests.

EDPS 630


NOTES:
Students who enter the PhD program with previous work in statistics and/or educational research and who, after examining the appropriate course syllabi, believe that they have satisfied one or more of these course requirements may petition the Graduate Committee for an exception. Such petitions must be accompanied by evidence supporting the claim of competence. Courses over five years of age used on a plan of study must be approved by the C&I Waiver Subcommittee at the time the plan of study is submitted. 

Suggestions For Graduate Mathematics Coursework

Graduate students in mathematics education are required to further their mathematical thinking by taking one or more graduate mathematics courses.  Unfortunately, some courses are specifically intended to prepare mathematics doctoral students for their qualifying exams and are therefore not as useful for a math education major.  The following list suggests possible courses that may be more useful/appropriate for a math education student plan of study.  Note that at least a few of these courses may be offered in the summer:

 

Undergrad courses that can count toward graduate degree (when taken by a graduate student): These are recommended for those who have not had a lot of experience with proofs, or those who have not taken a college-level geometry course.

 

á                MA 301 – Introduction to Proof through Real Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. An introduction to abstract reasoning in the context of real analysis. Topics may include axioms for the real numbers, mathematical induction, formal definition of limits, density, decimal representations, convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, the extreme value, mean value and intermediate value theorems, and cardinality. The emphasis, however, is more on the concept of proof than on any one given topic. Typically offered Fall Spring.

á                MA 460 – Geometry. Credit Hours: 3.00. This is a course in Euclidean geometry. It begins at the high-school level and then moves quickly to intermediate and advanced topics. Emphasis on proofs. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Category 1:  These courses do not typically involve a large number of proofs. They are service courses for engineers, and provide a deeper look at what you may have learned in undergraduate Linear algebra and calculus courses:

 

á                MA 510 – Multivariate Calculus. Credit Hours: 3.00. Calculus of functions of several variables and of vector fields in orthogonal coordinate systems. Optimization problems, implicit function theorem, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorems. Applications to engineering and the physical sciences. Not open to students with credit in MA 36200 or 41000. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

á                MA 511 – Linear Algebra.  Real and complex vector spaces; linear transformations; Gram-Schmidt process and projections; least squares; QR and LU factorization; diagonalization, real and complex spectral theorem; Schur triangular form; Jordan canonical form; quadratic forms. Typically offered Summer.

Category 2:  These courses cover interesting topics and involve more proofs then those in the first category.  The first two might be thought of as a graduate version of the undergraduate course of the same topic (a bridge course). 

 

á                MA 503 – Abstract Algebra.  Credit Hours: 3.00. Group theory: definitions, examples, subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, and isomorphism theorems. Ring theory: definitions, examples, homomorphisms, ideals, quotient rings, fraction fields, polynomial rings, Euclidean domains, and unique factorization domains. Field theory: algebraic field extensions, straightedge and compass constructions. Typically offered Fall.

á                MA 504 – Real Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. Completeness of the real number system, basic topological properties, compactness, sequences and series, absolute convergence of series, rearrangement of series, properties of continuous functions, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, equicontinuity, and the Arzela-Ascoli theorem. Typically offered Fall.

á                MA 516 – Advanced Probability And Options With Numerical Methods (Note that this course is easier then the 519 ŇIntroÓ course).  Stochastic interest rate models. American options from the probabilistic and PDE points of view.

á                Numerical methods for European and American options, including binomial, trinomial, and Monte-Carlo methods. Typically offered Fall.

á                MA 525 – Complex Analysis. (not MA 530 or 531) Complex numbers and complex-valued functions of one complex variable; differentiation and contour integration; Cauchy's theorem; Taylor and Laurent series; residues; conformal mapping; applications. Not open to students with credit in MA 42500. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Category 3:  These courses also cover interesting topics, but are definitely more advanced than the ones listed above.  They are typically proof heavy, and more abstract, but if you are good with proofs (and have been successful in Real Analysis), these are good courses to take. 

 

á       MA 514 – Numerical Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. (CS 51400) Iterative methods for solving nonlinear; linear difference equations, applications to solution of polynomial equations; differentiation and integration formulas; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations; roundoff error bounds. Typically offered Fall Spring.

á       MA 518 – Advanced Discrete Mathematics. Credit Hours: 3.00. The course covers mathematics useful in analyzing computer algorithms. Topics include recurrence relations, evaluation of sums, integer functions, elementary number theory, binomial coefficients, generating functions, discrete probability, and asymptotic methods. Typically offered Spring.

á       MA 519 – Introduction to Probability. Credit Hours: 3.00. (STAT 51900) Algebra of sets, sample spaces, combinatorial problems, independence, random variables, distribution functions, moment generating functions, special continuous and discrete distributions, distribution of a function of a random variable, limit theorems. Typically offered Spring Fall.

á       MA 571 – Topology. Credit Hours: 3.00. Fundamentals of point set topology with a brief introduction to the fundamental group and related topics, topological and metric spaces, compactness, connectedness, separation properties, local compactness, introduction to function spaces, basic notions involving deformations of continuous paths. Typically offered Fall.

á       MA 575 – Graph Theory. Credit Hours: 3.00. Introduction to graph theory with applications. Typically offered Summer Fall Spring.

BACK TO TOP

DOCTORAL STUDENT EXPECTATIONS

á  Students should with their advisor regularly – at least twice a semester. Once a committee has been formed, students should periodically meet with the members to keep them apprised of progress in the program and any problems that arise. 

 

á  Students are expected to document their meetings with faculty by taking accurate notes. In particular, these notes should summarize main topics of discussion, clarify any tasks to be completed by the student and/or faculty member, and clearly list the agreed-upon deadlines for such tasks. A copy of these notes should be e-mailed to the faculty member. 

 

á  Students are expected to attend and present their work at conferences.  See the enclosed list of conferences and/or discuss possibilities with your advisor.

 

á  Students are expected to comply with all requests for documentation in a timely manner. These documents contain important information for the mathematics education faculty and the graduate school. It is your professional responsibility to be aware of deadlines, complete these documents, and submit them on time to the necessary people.

 

á  Students are expected to work collaboratively with colleagues. Giving and receiving peer feedback is an important habit of mind to develop as a mathematics educator. Students should be willing to ask for and to give feedback to other graduate studentsŐ work.

 

á  Students are expected to seek answers to questions from other graduate students. Our experienced graduate students are excellent sources of information and advice.  More senior graduate students should actively pass on knowledge and information to newer students.  Newer students should also contact colleagues for information.

 

á  Students are expected to make the Purdue mathematics education community a priority, attending events and meetings whenever possible.  It is only through this type of commitment that a rich, intellectual collaboration will emerge.

 

á  Students are expected to maintain above a 3.0 GPA throughout their program, or face probation, suspension, or termination. In addition, only courses in which a student earns a C- or better may count towards graduate credit in the Plan of Work.

 

á  Ph.D. students are required to submit an Annual Review report to their advisor and the graduate office. This report allows you and your advisor to track your progress in coursework, and the various realms of graduate education such as teaching experiences, publications, presentations, work on research projects, and progress in graduate competencies.  This report is filed in early spring to report activities for a school year.

TEACHING EXPERIENCES

 

Because teaching courses is an essential component of the professoriate, doctoral students are encouraged to seek out opportunities to teach. Early in the doctoral program, students should seek opportunities to serve as a teaching assistant (TA) or to shadow a course for credit in the College of Education, Mathematics Department, local community colleges, etc. Later in the doctoral program, students should seek opportunities to serve as a guest instructor for a course, undergraduate or masterŐs level. This kind of experience will allow you to design and deliver instruction for a specified period of time under the supervision of a faculty member. Approach faculty members that are teaching courses with which you have some interest or previous experience. Students are also encouraged to spend time supervising student teachers. Because supervision of student teachers is often a requirement for faculty that teach in teacher education programs, doing this as a part of your doctoral program will give you some initial experience in what is involved with this process.

 

Talk with your advisor about opportunities for getting involved in teaching.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCES

A Ph.D. is a research degree. Hence, learning to conduct research is an essential element of obtaining the doctoral degree. Students are encouraged to seek out opportunities to work as a research assistant (RA) on a project or grant as soon as possible. Not all graduate assistantships are within the mathematics education program, so students should check with other sources. Besides providing funding via the graduate student support program, being part of a research project provides invaluable experience that cannot be gained in any other way. Students learn how faculty identify research problems, find sources of funding, write grant proposals, write proposals for talks and papers, form relationships with schools, get approval for data collection, collect, store and analyze data, work in a research team, negotiate preparation of annual reports, run advisory meetings and conferences, consult and collaborate with colleagues, analyze data and write findings and final reports. These are critical elements of professional practice as a researcher. Students with or without research assistantships should also constantly seek opportunities to collect research, write grants, and publish conference papers and journal articles with faculty and other graduate students. These experiences will be invaluable as students move onto the proposal and dissertation phases of the doctoral program.

Academic Integrity And Research Ethics

The University Research Integrity statement can be found here:

http://www.education.purdue.edu/discovery/research_integrity.html

 

Plagiarism is a serious issue in academic writing and research. Students who plagiarize work (i.e., pass off someone elseŐs work as oneŐs own without acknowledgement) face severe repercussions including dismissal from the program.  Ignorance of what constitutes plagiarism is not a viable excuse – it is important for students to check the resources here http://www.education.purdue.edu/discovery/research_integrity.html to be informed about this topic.   Students can (and should check their work before submitting to an instructor or committee through the Check Yourself iThenticate software, which will detect unintentional plagiarism. We strongly recommend use of the software for all of your classes and your thesis work. Contact the Check Yourself administrator in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction to get access to this software.

Institutional Review Board (IRB)

Any research that involves human subjects (for us, this means students, teachers, surveys of programs, analysis of student work/words, etc.) must comply with federal and state laws as well as University policies and procedures for the protection of human research subjects and must be approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). All information and forms for IRB can be found here: https://www.irb.purdue.edu/

 

Note that your study may actually fit the ŇExemptÓ category, but you must still submit the exempt forms to IRB to see if they agree.  The IRB office is usually quite helpful at answering questions that you might have before, during, or after submitting applications.  Contact the office secretary, Erica Berry, at 49-45942 or email irb@purdue.edu if you have questions.

Collaborative IRB Training Initiative (CITI) Training

Researchers involved in the use of human subjects are required to complete the CITI web-based education program in order to be certified as eligible to engage in human subject research at Purdue University. All researchers on an IRB protocol must complete the CITI training before the IRB protocol will be approved. Thus, we would like all Math Ed graduate students to take this training in their first semester (This will help avoid delays later on when/if you are invited to take part in a research project).  Initial and continuing education (every 5 years) in human subject protections are required.

Collaborative IRB Training Initiative (CITI)

https://www.irb.purdue.edu/

 

GRADUATE FORMS

You will need to fill out many forms as you progress through your degree, documenting progress through you program and through your course work, preliminary exams, proposal defense, and final Dissertation defense. A link to all Graduate School forms can be found at: http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/currentSt/index.html#forms .  and http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/research/thesis/required-forms.html

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH CREDITS

 

á       Students are expected to accumulate non-dissertation research hours through EDCI 620A. This course provides an opportunity to participate in research projects and engage in other professional development activities (e.g., CV development, practice conference talks). 

á       Independent studies (EDCI 590s) should be avoided when possible. If a 590 is required (advisorŐs discretion), specific tasks and deadlines will be developed in collaboration with the supervising faculty member. Students are expected to complete approximately 120-135 hours of work for a three-credit EDCI 590 course. 

á       Students should be registered for EDCI 69900 hours any semester in which they are engaged in dissertation research activities. A minimum of 15 hours of 69900 is required for graduation.

á       A student should complete the ŇContract for EDCI 590-699Ó below to determine a clear plan for how the grade for these credits will be assessed.  Faculty can also find this form in the Purdue Mathematics Education Dropbox folder.

 

EDCI 59000 OR 69900 CONTRACT  This is a contract between an advisor and a student (group of students) for study individually (or as small group) of a special problem in a selected area. Form must be completed and signed by you, your advisor and the instructor by the end of the first week of the semester in which the course is taken.

 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION GUIDELINES  (.doc file)

(Last updated February 2013)

 

Visit the COE Graduate Handbook for updated details of university policies:

o   Qualifications for holding a Prelim Examination

o   Requesting a Prelim Examination

o   Policy for Holding the Prelim Examination

o   Reporting Results of a Prelim Examination

PURPOSE

The purpose of the preliminary exam is for a doctoral student to demonstrate both knowledge of the field of mathematics education and abilities to analyze and synthesize the extant literature in the field. It is a learning opportunity for the student to revisit oneŐs understanding of broad issues in mathematics education as well as look in depth at the literature closely related to oneŐs research. It is also a benchmark and serves as a point in time where those admitted to the doctoral program demonstrate their readiness to engage in the scholarly work required of doctoral candidates.

REQUIREMENTS

á      A student must pass the preliminary exam at least two sessions (including Summer sessions) before the expected date of the final dissertation defense.

á      A student must have at least three members on their Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC). The committee should match information on a studentŐs Plan of Study (changes to committee members must be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies). Keep in mind that a fourth committee member will need to be added for the final dissertation defense, but is not necessary here. 

á      Before the preliminary exam can be scheduled, a student must:

o   Have completed at least 80% of required coursework

o   Have filed an approved Plan of Study (POS)

o   Supply a reading list to the members of the GAC. This list should be comprised of materials (journal articles and academic books or chapters) that the student has read over the course of their Ph.D. studies that they see as relevant to their research interests. The student should organize the list into subcategories, and write a narrative to explain how some or all of the readings relate to the studentŐs own research interests.

o   Schedule a meeting with the entire GAC to discuss:

¤  An appropriate start date for the preliminary exam

¤  The format and components of the written exam

¤  Suggested additions to a studentŐs reading list

á      To schedule the exam, the student must first submit a Graduate School Form 8 "Request for Appointment of Examining Committee" to hold the Prelim. This form is now submitted online by following  these directions:

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS Graduate School Form 8: Request for Appointment of Examining Committee

Please note that the plan of study for this degree must be in ÔOutstandingŐ or ÔApprovedŐ status to initiate an exam request.

 

1.          Login to myPurdue using your Purdue Career Account credentials.

2.          Select the ŇGraduate School Plan of StudyÓ link under the ŇGraduate StudentsÓ section on the ŇAcademicÓ tab.

3.          Select the ŇRequest for Appointment of Examining CommitteeÓ link to open the Exam Form Generator.

4.          Click on the ŇForm 8: Request for Appointment of Examining CommitteeÓ link to initiate the form, and then indicate the exam to be taken (preliminary or final examination).

5.          Click on the ŇUpdate Exam CommitteeÓ link to select the exam committee members; each committee member must be added one at a time.

6.          Enter the exam date, time, building and room number.

7.          In the ŇThesis TitleÓ section, enter the thesis title if requesting a final examination (or the preliminary title if this request is for a preliminary examination).

8.          Once completed, submit the form for approval.

 

Notes:

-       The form may be left in ŇSavedÓ status for editing, but must be submitted in order to be processed.

-       This request must be received by the Graduate School at least 3 weeks prior to the requested exam date.

-       If the exam form is submitted less than 2 weeks from the exam date, the committee chair and/or student will be approached to provide a justification

-       You will receive an automated email when the Form 8 has been fully approved.

 

á      If you need help with this, please contact the COE Office of Graduate Studies . The signed Graduate School Form 8 "Request for Appointment of Examining Committee" must be submitted online with enough time for the form to be processed and forwarded to the Graduate School at least two full weeks before the desired exam date (Graduate School Policy). Otherwise, the form will be returned unprocessed and will need to be resubmitted with a later exam date that will comply with the stated policy. Normally exceptions will not be granted.

á      It is recommended that a student have a reasonable sense of his/her dissertation topic area before scheduling the preliminary exam.

á      It is recommended that a student take the exam during or after their final semester of coursework to allow sufficient time for preparing and taking the exam. 

GUIDELINES FOR THE WRITTEN EXAMINATION IN MATH EDUCATION

There are two options available for the written portion of a studentŐs preliminary exam. The details for Option A and Option B are listed below.

 

Option A

A student choosing this option of the written preliminary examination will complete 3 written questions over a period of 3-6 weeks.

 

Procedures

á      The student receives questions in electronic and/or paper form on a specified start date chosen by the student and his/her GAC. Questions are written by the members of the GAC, with final approval of all questions given by the studentŐs advisor(s). Questions may have multiple parts.

á      Students have two time limit options to complete all 3 questions. Each question should require approximately one week of full-time work to complete.  Thus, upon agreement with the GAC, the exam may be completed in either three weeks of full-time work or up to six weeks of part-time work.

o   3-week option:  The student is given ONE question at the beginning of each week. This question is to be completed and emailed to the GAC after exactly 7 days (e.g., if Question 1 is received on a Monday at 10 am, then it is due the following Monday at 10 am).  The next question will not be given until the previous one is submitted.  NOTE: The 3 full-time weeks do not have to be consecutive, but should be confined to a two-month period.

o   6-week option:  The student is given all three questions at the start of the exam.  All three are due in exactly six weeks. Completed questions can be emailed to the GAC at any time during the six weeks.

á      International and ESL students must adhere to the deadlines listed here, but are permitted one additional week per question to submit a final copy that has been reviewed by an editor for grammatical and/or structural corrections (content, however, may not be changed from the original submissions).

á      The exam is to be completed independently.

 

Format

á      The written exam will consist of three questions:

 

1.     A general mathematics education question, grounded in the material covered in EDCI 635, 636, and/or 637

2.     A theoretical question, related to the studentŐs future research (e.g., if the student will be looking at group work, a question related to sociological theories of group dynamics would be appropriate)

3.     A Ňspecial areaÓ question, related closely to the foundational research literature in the area of the studentŐs future dissertation study.

 

á      The page requirement for each question is 10-20 pages, double-spaced, with 1Ó margins.

á      Papers should be written using academic style prose and adhering to APA formatting

á      Responses to these questions should reflect strong analytic thinking which, depending on the question, might include a comparative analysis of different schools of thought or research paradigms, and/or a critical analysis of strengths and limitations of the field. It is not appropriate to only review literature and (re)report what others have said. It must be taken further.

 

Evaluation

á       Each member of the GAC will read and grade two of the three exam questions. 

á       The GAC faculty will complete their evaluations and report results to the studentŐs advisor within 3 weeks from the final submission date. Evaluations are compared and discrepancies resolved through faculty discussion.

á       The student will meet with his/her advisor to discuss the results of the exam. Each of the three responses will be assessed as PASS, REWRITE, or FAIL.

o      If a student receives a PASS on all three questions, she/he may schedule the oral exam. 

o      If a student receives a REWRITE on any question, the student must make the necessary revisions to the question. A student who is asked to revise or redo a segment of their examination will be given specific feedback by the evaluators. All rewrites must be completed within 6 weeks of this meeting with the advisor.

o      Receiving a FAIL on any question (original or rewrite) results in failure of the preliminary exam and termination of a studentŐs Ph.D. program at Purdue University.

 

Option B

Students choosing this option will submit three artifacts: one journal-ready article or book chapter and two additional pieces of scholarly writing. Students are expected to have completed drafts of all artifacts prior to scheduling of exam.

 

Procedures

á      In this option, a student must schedule a meeting with the GAC at the beginning of the semester in which they intend to schedule the exam.

o   In collaboration with their GAC, the student will prepare a 2-page proposal describing three pieces of scholarly writing that will be submitted for their preliminary examination, along with an explanation of how that writing will meet the requirements of the examination.

¤  At least two different genres of writing must be included (e.g., literature review, course syllabus, book review)

¤  At least two different fields of study must be represented (e.g., teacher education, mathematics, education policy) or different theoretical/methodological foci (e.g., critical theory, discourse analysis, quantitative analysis).

¤  Collaborative writing is encouraged. Any co-authored work should be accompanied by a thorough description of the substantial contributions of the student. At least one of the submitted artifacts must be written solely by the student.

o    The proposal is due two weeks into the term that the student is taking the examination. Feedback concerning revisions of the proposal will be returned to the student by the fourth week of that term.

o   The GAC must approve all suggested artifacts for submission.

á      In the case that the GAC contains only one Purdue mathematics education faculty member, an additional mathematics education faculty member must be requested as an outside evaluator for the exam.

á      By a predetermined date (no later than 9 weeks into fall or spring OR 7 weeks into summer), the student will submit (electronically) all three writing samples and the original proposal to the GAC (and outside evaluator if required).

 

Format

á      Artifact 1: Every student must submit one article or chapter that is appropriate for submission for publication to a journal or a book. In preparing this manuscript, it is presumed that students will receive substantial feedback from committee members, other faculty, and doctoral students, and the manuscript will have undergone multiple revisions prior to the semester in which the examination is taken.

á      Artifacts 2 and 3: Two other pieces of scholarly writing are required. The genre for these artifacts is determined by the student in collaboration with their GAC. Students may select two of the following:

o   Published or submitted papers or chapters students have authored or co-authored

o   Research proposals that students have authored or co-authored

o   Ambitious (and subsequently revised) course papers

o   Grants students have authored or co-authored

o   Literature reviews

o   Critical book reviews

o   The following may also be submitted along with accompanying critical scholarly reflection

¤  Curricular materials

¤  Course syllabi

¤  Policy or procedure manuals students have authored or co-authored

¤  Presentations at a professional conference

¤  Websites designed to present information about oneŐs teaching

o   Students may propose alternative options as well, as long as they pass review of the GAC. 

á      While many of the artifacts above may have been started in courses or other experiences that doctoral students have teaching or conducting research, the materials submitted for examination will have to have been substantially revised, critiqued, and elaborated on in order to be ready for examination. For papers, this might mean that faculty and doctoral students provide critical feedback and that papers are revised, analyses is conducted, and more scholarship is reviewed and included before a course paper is ready for review at examination.

á      Students wishing to submit work that reflects their teaching will need to prepare explications of how they designed courses, how those courses have been revised and changed over time, and how they assess whether students learn from the courses. Similarly, with other artifacts of teaching or engagement, additional materials will need to be prepared to provide reviewers with adequate information to judge the quality of the studentŐs contribution to those materials.

 

Evaluation

á      Each member of the GAC will read and grade two of the three submitted artifacts. Artifact 1 must be read by two mathematics education faculty (and therefore will be sent to the outside evaluator if needed). All evaluators will have access to the proposal and to all three pieces of writing as background information for judging the particular pieces for which they have primary responsibility.

á      The GAC faculty will complete their evaluation and report results to the studentŐs advisor within 3 weeks from the final submission date. Evaluations are compared and discrepancies resolved through faculty discussion.

á      The student will meet with his/her advisor to discuss the results of the exam. Each of the three responses will be assessed as PASS, REWRITE, or FAIL.

o   If a student receives a PASS on all three questions, she/he may schedule the oral exam. 

o   If a student receives a REWRITE on any question, the student must make the necessary revisions. A student who is asked to revise or redo a segment of their examination will be given specific feedback by the evaluators. All rewrites must be completed within 6 weeks of this meeting with the advisor.  Revisions are re-evaluated and given a grade of PASS or FAIL only.

o   Receiving a FAIL on any question (original or rewrite) results in failure of the preliminary exam and termination of a studentŐs Ph.D. program at Purdue.

GUIDELINES FOR THE ORAL EXAMINATION

Procedure

á      The oral exam guidelines are the same regardless of which option was chosen for the written exam.

á      The student will contact the members of the GAC to select a date and time for the oral exam.

á      The student will schedule a room and time for the oral exam and submit Form 8 to the Office of Graduate Studies at least three weeks prior to the exam date. NOTE:  The oral exam must be scheduled two sessions before the studentŐs intended date for the final dissertation defense.

á      The oral exam should be scheduled no earlier than three weeks after submission of the written questions (or for summer submissions, three weeks into the fall semester) and will take place only after all written questions receive a mark of PASS. 

 

Format

á      The student will be expected to prepare and present a short power-point presentation (Ĺ20 minutes) summarizing the main ideas included in their submitted written exam.

á      The oral exam is to be a comprehensive examination covering the studentŐs field(s) of study and related topics as well as the content of the written examinations. Typically, each committee member in turn will ask the student to respond to questions or issues. 

á      NOTE: The dissertation proposal will not be a focus of the preliminary oral examination.

 

Evaluation

á      Possible results of the Oral Exam include PASS and FAIL

á      At the end of the oral exam, the student will be asked to leave the room so that the GAC can evaluate his/her performance.  In most cases, a decision will be made at this time and the student will be called back in to hear the results and to receive feedback from the committee.

á      Upon completion of the Oral Exam with a score of PASS, the GAC will sign the Form 10 (this form is sent directly to the advisor before the exam date) and submit it to the Office of Graduate Studies.

GENERAL RUBRIC FOR EVALUATION

In the case of both Option A and B for the written examination and in the oral examination, evaluators should examine a studentŐs progress in terms of the following dimensions:

 

1.          Knowledge of a chosen field of specialization: What fields of specialization are reflected in this work? Does the student demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of his/her chosen field(s) of specialization? Are major developments in the field acknowledged? Are major criticisms acknowledged? Does the student locate his/her scholarship with the field in valid ways? Are critical terms defined? Are the cited articles/papers used properly, as the authors intended? Are the references cited the most appropriate to support the manuscript? Are theories appropriately used?

2.          Ability to construct an effective argument: Does the argument follow a logical development? Is the evidence provided adequate to support the argument? Does the author make clear how the referenced works support the argument? If appropriate, does the author anticipate and address counter-arguments to his or her position? Are complementary issues or perspectives considered? Are the analyses appropriate and logical? Theoretically sound? Described in enough detail? If relevant, how is evidence and/or data used? Are the conclusions supported? Are warrants appropriately used?

3.          Ability to write stylistically and intellectually at a level of sophistication commensurate with the dissertation and future professional writing: Is the response comprehensible? Is the writing well edited? Does the authorŐs use of linguistic conventions (grammar, syntax, organization) and of language enable the reader to follow the argument?

 

BACK TO TOP

 

PROPOSAL FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH

Visit the COE Grad Handbook for updated details: Department of Curriculum and Instruction Proposal Guidelines

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

The proposal for dissertation research is submitted after the student has successfully passed their preliminary examination. The cover sheet for the proposal may be picked up in the COE Office of Graduate Studies or accessed at ../../Docs/word_doc/PROPOSAL_FOR_DISSERTATION_RESEARCH.doc. The original cover sheet for the proposal must be signed by the student's committee and submitted to the COE Office of Graduate Studies after the proposal has been approved by the student's committee. The student should bring this sheet to the proposal defense for signatures.

1.     Purpose - The dissertation proposal is a formal proposal for a dissertation project; the purpose of the proposal is twofold:

a.     to ensure that a candidate has a concrete, specific and workable plan for the dissertation, and

b.     to allow the advisory committee to offer constructive suggestions for improving the student's dissertation project before it is underway.

 

2.     Developing a Proposal - The proposal may be started at any time prior to the dissertation, but it is typically completed after a student has passed the written and oral portions of the preliminary examinations. The development of a formal proposal should begin only when a student, in consultation with the major professor, is confident the idea to be proposed is workable and of such importance that it merits the consideration of the examining committee. Most important, the idea should be one the student has a genuine interest in pursuing. In most cases, formal data collection should not begin until after the dissertation proposal has been approved by all members of the advisory committee.

 

3.     Format: Please see the section titled ŇDissertation Proposal RecommendationsÓ at http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/facultyhandbook/proposal_disser_res/index.html

 

4.     Approval of the Proposal - The committee will consist of a minimum of four (4) members of the graduate faculty. At least two academic sessions* devoted to research and writing must elapse between the preliminary and final doctoral examinations. The proposal should be approved first by the major professor and then delivered to the remaining members of the examining committee at least two (2) weeks prior to a meeting scheduled to discuss its merits. The proposal meeting should be called by the major professor, who should notify the other members of the examining committee. 

 

 

DISSERTATION

A student is admitted to candidacy by passing the written and oral preliminary examination. Once a student is admitted to candidacy, they should be advancing their dissertation research. Students must enroll in EDCI 699 for at least 15 credits of Doctoral Dissertation Research.

 

á            The university requires all theses and dissertations to be submitted and approved electronically. For this process to be completed accurately and efficiently, all students are encouraged to attend an ETD workshop early in their doctoral program. A schedule of workshops offered is posted each semester on the graduate schoolŐs thesis information website

 

á            As doctoral students near the end of the dissertation process, there are a number of forms that must be completed and filed with the graduate school in order for your dissertation to be published and for you to be awarded your final degree. A list of all forms including links to each form is provided in this handbook. Be sure to review the requirements for each form in detail to ensure that all paperwork is completed and submitted on time. Please see website at the Graduate School that describes the process for each of the required forms. http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/research/thesis/required-forms.html

 

o  It is important to note that doctoral students are required to initiate the filing of many of these forms. It is the responsibility of the student to keep track of all paperwork that needs to be filed, acquire necessary signatures in a timely manner and submit paperwork to The Graduate School.

Research Stages

1.                    Proposal Defense. The dissertation proposal typically includes a literature review, framework, and details about methodology, including proposed methods of analysis. The public defense of the proposal must be attended by a full committee of four members. The proposal defense is held after approval is obtained by the committee chair(s) that the candidate is ready for such a defense. A copy of the proposal must be submitted to committee members at least 2 weeks in advance of the scheduled defense.

2.                   Research and Writing of a Dissertation occur over an extended period of time (typically one academic year or more) and should include frequent discussions with the committee chair(s). Students will draft chapters of their dissertation and review them with their chair(s). Typically, a dissertation includes an introduction and problem statement, a literature review, methodology chapter including the research design, a results chapter (sometimes two or more), and conclusions and future directions. Modifications of this format occur based on the topic and type of the dissertation in consultation with the chair(s) and the other committee members. Once the chair(s) has approved it, the students should share their drafts with other members and keep all membership updated on progress.

3.                   Final Doctoral Oral Examination is scheduled after the dissertation study is complete and well written with approval by the committee chair(s), except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination. The Final Doctoral Oral Examination must be attended by all committee members and is open to the University Community. See details below for how to schedule the exam. The student must submit a copy of the dissertation to all committee members at least 2 weeks before the scheduled date. See below for format of this examination.

 

Qualifications for holding a Final Examination
The Final Doctoral Oral Examination may not occur earlier than two complete semesters after successful completion of the Preliminary Exam. For instance, a doctoral student who passes the preliminary examination in a summer session is eligible to take the final examination (provided that the student is registered for the following fall and spring semesters) beginning with the following summer session. A Prelim must be passed before the last day classes end in a session for it to count for that session. A student must be registered in the session they plan to hold their final examination.

Format Of Final Doctoral Examination

Though the format of the doctoral examination may vary examinations include 3 elements.

 

1.               Presentation by the candidate. The candidate typically presents the methodology used, the data collected, and the conclusions reached as reported in the dissertation. For the purpose of dissemination of research, it is required that the presentation of the dissertation be open to the university community.

2.               Questioning of the candidate. Any member of the university community is allowed to ask questions of the candidate. If the need arises, graduate faculty members not on the advisory committee may meet in a restricted session after the presentation to ask additional questions of the student and express any concerns they have to the committee and student. The questioning phase may continue with a closed session in which the advisory committee questions the candidate.

3.               Deliberation and decision. Only the advisory committee and the Graduate School representative, if one has been appointed, are present.

Scheduling the Final Examination

It is highly recommended that you attend the "Thesis Formatting Workshop" which is presented by the Graduate School every semester (dates will be advertised by email early in the semester).

1.     You are required to meet with the your Thesis Chair at least 1-2 months in advance of the proposed exam date to ensure that you understand requirements and the scheduling process for the Final Exam. You should also be mindful of the Graduate School's Graduation Deadlines.

 

2.     Once you and your Thesis Committee have agreed upon the date for the exam (recommend doing this approximately 2 months in advance of proposed exam date so that schedules can be coordinated), you must schedule the room by working with the Math Ed program secretary.  If any committee members will be video-conferencing for the exam, it is recommended that you schedule BRNG 3272 and work with Mike Eldridge to set up the necessary technology.

 

3.     In order to officially schedule your exam, you must submit the electronic GS Form 8 via myPurdue. Go to your electronic plan of study and then choose the link for requesting the examining committee. The electronic form must be submitted by you and be signed by your research advisor at least 17 business days before the proposed date of the exam or the exam cannot be scheduled. In the case of co-advisors, one of them will need to sign. The exam is not officially scheduled until the Graduate School sends such notification to the COE Graduate Office.

 

4.     You should submit your written thesis for the Final Examination (follow formatting at Graduate School Thesis website) to all members of your Thesis Committee at least 2 weeks before the Final Examination..  Ask the members ahead of time if they would prefer an electronic or hard copy of your materials. 

 

5.     BRING TO THE EXAM:

a.     The COE Graduate Competencies Form  (.doc file) should be taken to the exam and must be completed by the Committee Chair and returned to the COE Graduate Office within one week following the exam. 

b.     When the Committee approves of the written thesis, all members must also sign the "Purdue University Graduate School Thesis Acceptance" (GS Form 9 http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/research/thesis/required-forms.html  ). The Thesis Committee may elect to sign the Form 9 immediately following the Final Examination if it does not recommend significant changes to the thesis. If changes are to be made to the thesis before deposition, committee members may elect to withhold signature on the GS Form 9 until they have the opportunity to read and approve the final version.

 

6.     If you pass the Final Examination, your Thesis Committee Chair will initiate the electronic "Report of the Final Examination" form online and should ensure that all fields are completed. Upon his or her submission of this form, the thesis committee members will be notified to sign the electronic "Report of the Final Examination". This should be completed as soon as possible following the exam and no later than the semester deadline to pass the final exam.

 

7.     After a successful exam, each candidate is required to type the required GS Form 32, Thesis/Dissertation Agreement, Publication Delay, and Certification/Disclaimer, as well as the ETD version of the GS Form 9, which is typed but not signed and inserted into the thesis/dissertation. See Graduate School Thesis website for detailed instructions and a list of the required forms for master's and Ph.D.

 

8.     Thesis submission to the Graduate School for both MS and PhD is electronic . Refer to the thesis deposit timelines, checklists, and formatting instructions on the Graduate School Thesis website for steps necessary to deposit the final thesis with the Graduate School. The Graduate School Thesis Formatting Office requires students to submit their thesis electronically at least 24 hours (preferably 48 hours) prior to a required appointment that you must schedule with the Graduate School Thesis Formatting Advisor. The Graduate School Thesis Formatting Advisor will then review your electronic submission and contact you if you need to make corrections before the required in-person meeting. Each candidate will be provided a letter from the Graduate School with links to required surveys. Submission of the survey(s) is required before you will receive your thesis/dissertation deposit receipt and/or graduate. Once you've completed the required surveys and questionnaires, you must print out the completion certificates, which you will submit to the Graduate School at your thesis deposit meeting.  It is also highly recommended that you attend the "Thesis Formatting Workshop" presented by the Graduate School every semester (dates will be advertised early in the semester).

 

9.     The necessity of a final hard copy of your thesis or dissertation to be provided to your research advisor and other committee members is left to your discretion in consultation with your the major professor. Because thesis deposit with the Graduate School is electronic, you are not required to submit a hardbound copy to BME or to the Graduate School.

Outcome Of Final Examination

á          A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required for passing the final oral examination. Approval may be conditional, however, on the student's meeting specific requirements prescribed by the student's advisory committee.

á    If the examination is unsatisfactory, at least one semester must elapse before a final examination is repeated. A new request GS Form 8 must be submitted.

á    A student has five years from the date they pass Prelims to successfully pass their final defense. If a student exceeds the five-year limit, the student's Prelim becomes invalid and will have to be retaken. (School Policy, September 1993)

á    A preliminary examination passed by a student whose graduate study and/or professional activity has been inactive for five years or more is invalid. (Grad  Policy)

 

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ANNUAL REVIEW

 

All graduate students are required to meet with their advisor for an annual progress review and fill out and submit annual review documents to the COE graduate office (COE policy). For the Ph.D. program, students complete two forms. The first is a checklist/data entry Excel file to indicate your progress through coursework and milestones in the program.  The second is a more detailed reflective tool intended to help you examine the progress youŐve made in one year, determine your areas of strength and weakness, and share concerns or interests with your advisor. 

á  In December of each year, your advisor will send you updated copies of the two forms.  Files as of 3/11/15:

o      Annual Ph.D. Progress Report.xls, and

o     PhD Annual Review.docx

á  Annual Review documents are due Febuary 15th each year.

á  After submitting your documents, schedule a meeting to review and discuss the forms with your advisor as soon as possible.

á  Submit a copy of the Annual Review document, signed by you and your advisor, to the COE Grad Office in BRNG Hall.  This document will be added to your graduate file.

 

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JOB SEARCH

As soon as possible, students should meet with their initial advisor to outline their professional goals, and develop and regularly update a curriculum vitae (CV). Regular meetings with the advisor will help students to develop a dossier for the job search. Although every job search will vary depending on type, it is important for students (especially those that intend to pursue a job in academics) to attend and present at conferences, become involved in leadership activities both locally and nationally, submit papers for publication, and maintain professional contacts in the field.

 

Math education job postings are listed on many professional organizationŐs websites including:

¤   Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators http://amte.net/resources/joblistings

¤   The Chronicle of Higher Education http://chronicle.com/

¤   AERA Research in Mathematics Education SIG http://www.sigrme.org/xopenpositions.html

¤   National Council of Teachers of Mathematics http://nctm-jobs.jobtarget.com/home/index.cfm?site_id=4366

 

Constantly consulting with faculty and advanced graduate students is perhaps the best way to learn about professional opportunities, preparing for interviews, and presenting work to search committees.

 

* It is important to keep in mind that the job search process takes a lot of time.  It involves searching the job posts, writing multiple teaching and research statements and cover letters, doing phone interviews, and visiting job sites.  Students need to plan for the time this will take when considering their timeline for dissertation data collection, writing, etc. *

 

Other online Resources For Job Searches

á  The Professor is In (blog) www.theprofessorisin.com

á  Eric HsuŐs collection of job search links: http://bfc.sfsu.edu/cgi-bin/hsu.pl?Math_Education_Job_Search_Resources

á  Timeline: http://www.maa.org/publications/periodicals/loci/joma/a-timeline-for-a-job-search-in-mathematics-introduction

á  Transitioning from grad student to faculty

o     http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Advancement-and-Promotion/Postdoctoral-Fellows/Transitioning-to-early-career-professional/Becoming-a-Faculty-Member

o    http://www.researchgate.net/publication/237790618_Now_What_Making_the_Transition_from_Student_to_Faculty_Member

 

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MASTERŐS DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

MASTERŐS DEGREE COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The mathematics education program emphasizes the development of mathematics pedagogy as well as knowledge of mathematics education research. The program is designed for in-service teachers wishing to take additional course work or working towards a MasterŐs degree in mathematics education, students wishing to pursue a MasterŐs and certification to teach in mathematics education, and students wishing to obtain a MasterŐs degree in mathematics education in order to continue into a doctoral program. The program is comprised of a minimum of 30 credits of coursework in three major areas: Mathematics Education, Mathematics, and Research.

 

I. Mathematics Education (12 hours)

 

In mathematics education, students engage in courses that address the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics as described by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

 

Core Courses (required for all students):

 

á      EDCI 54800         Teaching Mathematics to Diverse Learners

á      EDCI 54900         Assessment in Mathematics Education

Select at least two of the following mathematics pedagogy courses:

á      EDCI 53300         Teaching and Learning Number and Operations

á      EDCI 53400         Teaching and Learning Geometry and Measurement

á      EDCI 53500         Teaching and Learning Algebra and Functions

á      EDCI 53600         Teaching and Learning Data Analysis and Probability

 

II. Related Area (6 hours)

 

All plans of study should have appropriate course work in mathematics, statistics, educational technology, or a related field.

 

III. Research, Development and Exit Requirements (3-9 hours)

 

á      ALL STUDENTS: EDPS 53300  Introduction to Educational Research (3 credits)

á      NON-THESIS STUDENTS: Master's competencies portfolio (addresses required graduate competencies for the Department of Curriculum & Instruction graduate competencies)

á      THESIS TRACK STUDENTS: EDCI 69800 (M.S. Thesis – six credits required)

IV. Electives (3-9 hours)

 

Non-thesis track students may take three electives, while thesis track students may take one electives in any of the three major areas (math education, mathematics, or research).

 

TIMELINE FOR REVIEWS AND EVALUATIONS

Review/Evaluation

When

Planning Course Work

Initially, meet with your temporary faculty advisor to begin planning the course work that you will pursue for your degree. You will meet with your advisor/committee chair prior to the beginning of each semester to plan course work.

Portfolio Review

Your portfolio will be reviewed by your advisor/committee chair every year in order to check your progress toward development of the graduate competencies. The portfolio should be submitted no later than the middle of the fall or spring semester for annual review.  You must submit your final portfolio by the end of the semester prior to the semester in which you intend to graduate. Your oral defense of your proposal by the end of the second week of the semester in which you intend to graduate.

Annual Review

A yearly progress review will be conducted by the faculty each May. Student Progress Reports should be submitted by the end of Spring semester.

Graduate Committee and
Plan of Study

Formulate your graduate committee and create a Plan of Study to be filed with the Graduate School when about a third of the course work has been completed. The Plan of Study is first approved by your graduate committee and then by the Graduate School.

Thesis (optional)

Prepare a proposal for your thesis. Your graduate committee must approve the proposal before you can proceed. After approval, proceed with the thesis study. Prepare your final report. Defend your thesis to your committee.

 

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DESCRIPTION OF CORE MASTERŐS COURSES

Upon completion of an advanced program of study, candidates are accomplished educators whose practices are consistent with these standards. In addition, the Mathematics Education Program has chosen the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) content standards from Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (PSSM) as the content foundation for four of the MasterŐs courses:

 

EDCI 53300 – Teaching and Learning Number and Operations

This course is designed to provide opportunities for mathematics educators to develop understanding of teaching and learning in the domain of number and operation. Central to this work is the construction of models of learnersŐ understanding of number and operation and the use of those models to build and select curriculum. While curricular efforts have historically taken as central a formal view of mathematics and its construction, more recently curriculum has been written to engage learners and to build from knowledge of learnersŐ understanding. In this course we will develop models of learnerŐs understandings of different facets of number and operation and then use those models and our emerging understanding of curriculum to explore challenges in teaching and learning.

 

EDCI 53400 -- Teaching and Learning Geometry and Measurement

This course is designed to provide opportunities for mathematics educators to develop understanding of teaching and learning in the related domains of geometry and measurement. Central to this work is the construction of models of learnersŐ understandings of geometry and measurement and the use of models to design instruction. Geometry, as a discipline in school mathematics, has historically and more currently been debated. In this course we will explore research in the teaching and learning of geometry and measurement. A synthesis of select literature will inform our efforts to develop models of learnersŐ geometric reasoning and understanding of measurement. We will move past the development of models to the design of instruction meant to support understandings of concepts that utilize technology.

 

EDCI 53500 -- Teaching and Learning Algebra and Functions

This is a course for current or prospective mathematics teachers wishing to explore ways of teaching algebra with a focus on addressing concerns related to student performance in algebra and increasing algebraic reasoning skills in the classroom. The course includes experiences with inquiry-based learning by engaging participants in algebra activities from two secondary National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards-based curricula. The course will provide opportunities for participants to collaborate on the development of algebraic thinking in mathematics classrooms and will address pedagogical approaches to studentsŐ learning of algebra.

 

EDCI 53600 -- Teaching and Learning Data Analysis and Probability

This course will provide opportunities for the growth of middle school mathematics teachers understanding of data analysis and probability as a means to help analyze and interpret experienced events. The course will address the following: selecting and using appropriate statistical methods to analyze data, developing and evaluating inferences and predictions that are based on data, and understanding and applying the basic concepts of probability. This course will also address pedagogical approaches to studentsŐ learning of data analysis and probability.

 

Interwoven throughout all of these courses will be NCTMŐs principles of Teaching, Learning, Curriculum, and Technology.  Two additional courses have been designed to devote focused attention on the principles of Equity and Assessment due to the emphasis in these areas at the both the Unit and National levels:

 

EDCI 54800 –Teaching Mathematics to Diverse Learners

This course is designed to provide opportunities for in-service teachers to engage around issues of equity in mathematics education. Equity here is used as a broad construct intended to help us think about how to provide meaningful opportunities to learn for all the students in our mathematics classrooms. The notion of ŇdiverseÓ here is also taken broadly. All students have special needs, but it is sometimes helpful to think about the needs of particular groups of students while at the same time avoiding reducing differences among students to stereotypes. Issues of diversity here include, but are not limited to race, culture, gender, disabilities, language, SES, and sexual orientation.

 

EDCI 54900 –Assessment in Mathematics Education

This course is designed to help teachers of mathematics recognize the link between productive assessment and productive instruction, using the mathematics education standards for teacher competence in educational assessment. This course is designed to help teachers meet those professional standards and understand the public pressure as well as instructional need for effective formative and summative assessment.

 

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MASTERŐS DEGREE PLAN OF STUDY GUIDELINES (.pdf file)

A student should discuss the plan of study with the faculty advisor/chair. To create a plan of study, access myPurdue at http://www.mypurdue.purdue.edu.  On the Academic tab there is a link to the Graduate School Plan of Study, which takes you to the Graduate Student Database.

 

The plan of study may be submitted as a ŇDraft.Ó An e-mail notification is sent to the advisory committee who may review, if desired, and indicate any changes to be made. When the plan has been completed, the student should submit it as ŇFinal.Ó At that time, electronic approval is required of the manager of the Office of Graduate Studies, advisory committee members, department head, Graduate School authorization, and Graduate School processor.

 

Please keep in mind the following policies regarding the plan of study:

 

á      Students must be registered (enrolled in classes) or have eligibility to enroll during the semester that the plan of study is submitted. {GS}

 

á      Students should file their plan of study within their 2nd semester. At least one-half of the total credit hours used to satisfy degree requirements must be earned while registered at Purdue University. {GS}

 

á      More than 50 percent of Purdue credits must be earned through the campus where the degree is conferred. {GS}

 

á      MasterŐs degree programs require a minimum of 12 hours of graduate work in Education earned at Purdue. {C}

 

á      Hours of course work with an Education prefix must be equal to or greater than those hours completed in other departments. {C}

 

á      Purdue University courses taken while in regular graduate status must be ŇCÓ or above in order to meet degree requirements. {GS}

 

á      Only transfer courses taken at another accredited university for a grade of A or B may appear on a plan of study. {GS}

 

á      Courses taken as non-degree, excess undergraduate credit (only accepted if the student had senior standing and the course is specifically designated as excess graduate credit), or transfer credit must be ŇBÓ or above. {GS}

 

á      Up to 12 credits taken while in post-baccalaureate or teacher license status (including any undergraduate excess credits) with a grade of ŇBÓ or better, may be considered for use on a plan of study for an advanced degree. If requesting more than 12 credit hours, a waiver* must be submitted for approval. {GS}

 

á      Courses taken, as Pass/Fail or audited may NOT be used on a plan of study. Departmental credit for a course cannot be used. {GS} A maximum of 18 credits will be allowed from any one semester (9 credit hours for the summer session) on a plan of study. {GS}

 

á      Courses must be less than 5 years old to be considered for use on a plan of study for an advanced degree. {D} If using courses over 5 years of age {D} or having a lapse of five years of graduate study {GS}, a waiver request* must be submitted.

 

á      Courses taken as 590/591 are limited to 12 credit hours. If requesting to use more than 12 hours, a waiver request* must be submitted for approval. {D}

 

á      A waiver request* to use 300 and 400 level course work on a plan of study (when taken as a graduate student at Purdue University) may be considered by the departmentŐs graduate committee. {C} With an approved waiver, 300 and 400 level course work may not exceed six credit hours. {GS}

 

á      The number of thesis research hours (698) should be noted by the student in the comments section and will apply toward the number of hours needed for the degree. {GS}

 

á      MasterŐs Thesis must have at least 6 hours of research course work. {D}

 

á      A maximum of 9 Purdue credit hours of coursework at the 50000 and 60000 level used to satisfy the requirements of one Purdue masterŐs degree may be used on the plan of study for another Purdue masterŐs degree. Coursework used to satisfy the requirements of a masterŐs degree from an institution other than Purdue may not be used on a Purdue masterŐs plan of study. {GS}

 

á      Committee must have a minimum of 3 members of whom 51% must be regular Purdue Faculty with Graduate School certification. {GS}

 

á      The committee chair or at least one co-chair must be from the C&I program area where the student is admitted. It is strongly recommended that at least 1 committee member be selected from the C&I faculty. {D}

 

GS=Graduate School Policy              C=College Policy         D=Department Policy

 

*Waiver Request Form— http://www.education.purdue.edu/gradoffice/currentSt/pos.html

Office of Graduate Studies , Purdue University 765-494-2345

education-gradoffice@purdue.edu,

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DEVELOPING THE PLAN OF STUDY (M.S.)

For updated details, see the resource on the COE website: Master's Non-Thesis and Thesis Plan of Study Department of Curriculum & Instruction

Forming a Committee

á  A student's committee must be 51% Purdue faculty with Graduate School certification. (Graduate School Policy)

á  The committee chair or at least one co-chair must be from the C&I program area where the student is admitted. It is strongly recommended that at least 1 committee member be selected from the C&I faculty. (Department Policy)

Degree Title

á  The degree title for a Master's Non-Thesis student is: Master of Science in Education: Non Thesis

á  The degree title for a Master's Thesis student is: Master of Science in Education: Thesis

á  In order for a student to receive a Master of Science degree, the students plan of study must have a majority of Science related coursework

á  The student's area of specialization is the program area the student is admitted to.

Department Foundations And Research Requirements

Students must complete the Graduate Competencies Requirements for the program area they are admitted to. These requirements may be obtained from the student's program area. A general outline of the Graduate Competencies Requirements can be located at: http://www.edci.purdue.edu/grad_studies/grad_competencies.html.

Suggestions For Graduate Mathematics Coursework

Graduate students in mathematics education are required to further their mathematical thinking by taking one or more graduate mathematics courses.  Unfortunately, the courses offered at Purdue are not necessarily designed to think about mathematical pedagogy or to connect to K-12 mathematics, and some courses are specifically intended to prepare mathematics doctoral students for their qualifying exams and are therefore not as useful for a math ed major.  The following list suggests possible courses that may be more useful/appropriate for the plan of study. A few of these courses may be offered in summer:

 

Undergrad courses that can count toward graduate degree: These courses are recommended for those who have not had a lot of experience with proofs, or those who have not taken a college-level geometry course.

 

á  MA 301 – Introduction to Proof through Real Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. An introduction to abstract reasoning in the context of real analysis. Topics may include axioms for the real numbers, mathematical induction, formal definition of limits, density, decimal representations, convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, the extreme value, mean value and intermediate value theorems, and cardinality. The emphasis, however, is more on the concept of proof than on any one given topic. Typically offered Fall Spring.

á  MA 460 –  Geometry. Credit Hours: 3.00. This is a course in Euclidean geometry. It begins at the high-school level and then moves quickly to intermediate and advanced topics. Emphasis on proofs. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Category 1:  These courses do not typically involve a large number of proofs. They are service courses for engineers, and provide a deeper look at what you may have learned in undergraduate Linear algebra and calculus courses:

 

á  MA 510 – Multivariate Calculus. Credit Hours: 3.00. Calculus of functions of several variables and of vector fields in orthogonal coordinate systems. Optimization problems, implicit function theorem, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorems. Applications to engineering and the physical sciences. Not open to students with credit in MA 36200 or 41000. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

á  MA 511 – Linear Algebra.  linear transformations; Real and complex vector spaces; Gram-Schmidt process and projections; least squares; QR and LU factorization; diagonalization, real and complex spectral theorem; Schur triangular form; Jordan canonical form; quadratic forms. Typically offered Summer.

Category 2:  These courses cover interesting topics and involve more proofs then those in the first category.  The first two might be thought of as a graduate version of the undergraduate course of the same topic (a bridge course). 

 

á      MA 503 – Abstract Algebra.  Credit Hours: 3.00. Group theory: definitions, examples, subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, and isomorphism theorems. Ring theory: definitions, examples, homomorphisms, ideals, quotient rings, fraction fields, polynomial rings, Euclidean domains, and unique factorization domains. Field theory: algebraic field extensions, straightedge and compass constructions. Typically offered Fall.

á      MA 504 – Real Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. Completeness of the real number system, basic topological properties, compactness, sequences and series, absolute convergence of series, rearrangement of series, properties of continuous functions, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, equicontinuity, and the Arzela-Ascoli theorem. Typically offered Fall.

á      MA 516 – Advanced Probability And Options With Numerical Methods (Note that this course is easier then the 519 ŇIntroÓ course).  Stochastic interest rate models. American options from the probabilistic and PDE points of view. Numerical methods for European and American options, including binomial, trinomial, and Monte-Carlo methods. Typically offered Fall.

á  MA 525 – Complex Analysis. (not MA 530 or 531) Complex numbers and complex-valued functions of one complex variable; differentiation and contour integration; Cauchy's theorem; Taylor and Laurent series; residues; conformal mapping; applications. Not open to students with credit in MA 42500. Typically offered Fall Spring Summer.

Category 3:  These courses also cover interesting topics, but are definitely more advanced than the ones listed above.  They are typically proof heavy, and more abstract, but if you are good with proofs (and have been successful in Real Analysis), these are good courses to take. 

 

á  MA 514 – Numerical Analysis. Credit Hours: 3.00. (CS 51400) Iterative methods for solving nonlinear; linear difference equations, applications to solution of polynomial equations; differentiation and integration formulas; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations; roundoff error bounds. Typically offered Fall Spring.

á  MA 518 – Advanced Discrete Mathematics. Credit Hours: 3.00. The course covers mathematics useful in analyzing computer algorithms. Topics include recurrence relations, evaluation of sums, integer functions, elementary number theory, binomial coefficients, generating functions, discrete probability, and asymptotic methods. Typically offered Spring.

á  MA 519 – Introduction to Probability. Credit Hours: 3.00. (STAT 51900) Algebra of sets, sample spaces, combinatorial problems, independence, random variables, distribution functions, moment generating functions, special continuous and discrete distributions, distribution of a function of a random variable, limit theorems. Typically offered Spring Fall.

á  MA 571 – Topology. Credit Hours: 3.00. Fundamentals of point set topology with a brief introduction to the fundamental group and related topics, topological and metric spaces, compactness, connectedness, separation properties, local compactness, introduction to function spaces, basic notions involving deformations of continuous paths. Typically offered Fall.

á  MA 575 – Graph Theory. Credit Hours: 3.00. Introduction to graph theory with applications. Typically offered Summer Fall Spring.

Professional Development

Students enrolled in the MasterŐs program are encouraged to gain professional development experiences outside of typical coursework at the university. A table is provided on pages 12-13 that lists a number of mathematics education related and affiliated professional organizations. Attend local and national conferences, if possible. It is also recommended that students become active members of local or national organizations. Not only will membership in these organizations give you access to their journals and current research in the field, it also provides a venue for professional networking.

Students should seek opportunities to attend a variety of professional development outside of school and to also conduct professional development workshops for their colleagues.

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FIELD EXPERIENCE COMPONENTS OF MASTERŐS COURSES

EDCI 53600         Teaching and Learning Data Analysis and Probability

Field Experience:  Research into Practice with Students (50 pts.):  Graduate students will work in small groups of 2-4 to plan a research-based lesson or task-based interview of a series of 2-3 tasks. If a lesson is planned, graduate students will implement the lesson in an appropriate classroom, observe studentsŐ work during the lesson, and examine studentsŐ written work on tasks after the lesson. Ideally, the lesson can be taught twice so that revisions can be made based on feedback.  If an interview is done, graduate students will interview at least two appropriate aged students and examine the video of the interview and studentsŐ written work afterwards to analyze the studentsŐ understandings.

 

These structured field experiences can take place in multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after-school programs, alternate youth centers, or in the schools and classrooms in which the graduate students work.

The final write-up of the project will include a 3-4 page description of the research supporting the methods and tasks used, details on the lesson or interview protocol, and 5-10 pages on analysis and reflection.

Possible Topics: Sampling Distributions, Variability, Understanding Graphing, Randomness, Law of Large Numbers, Hypothesis Testing, Measures of Center, Linear Regression, Covariation and correlation, Probability simulations, Subjective probability and Bayes Theorem, Exploratory Data Analysis

 

EDCI 53500         Teaching and Learning Algebra and Functions

Field Experience:  Research into Practice with Students (50 pts.):  Graduate students will work in small groups of 2-4 to plan a research-based lesson or task-based interview of a series of 2-3 tasks. If a lesson is planned, graduate students will implement the lesson in an appropriate classroom, observe studentsŐ work during the lesson, and examine studentsŐ written work on tasks after the lesson. Ideally, the lesson can be taught twice so that revisions can be made based on feedback.  If an interview is done, graduate students will interview at least two appropriately aged students and examine the video of the interview and studentsŐ written work afterwards to analyze the studentsŐ understandings.

 

These structured field experiences can take place in multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after-school programs, alternate youth centers, or in the schools and classrooms in which the graduate students work.

The final write-up of the project will include a 3-4 page description of the research supporting the methods and tasks used, details on the lesson or interview protocol, and 5-10 pages on analysis and reflection.

Possible Topics: Linear and quadratic equations, functions, polynomials, factoring, exponents, rational expressions, inequalities, graphing, ratios and proportionality, word problems, solving systems of equations, complex numbers.

 

EDCI 53400         Teaching and Learning Geometry and Measurement

Field Experience:  Research into Practice with Students (50 pts.):  Graduate students will work in small groups of 2-4 to plan a research-based lesson or task-based interview of a series of 2-3 tasks. If a lesson is planned, graduate students will implement the lesson in an appropriate classroom, observe studentsŐ work during the lesson, and examine studentsŐ written work on tasks after the lesson. Ideally, the lesson can be taught twice so that revisions can be made based on feedback.  If an interview is done, graduate students will interview at least two appropriate aged students and examine the video of the interview and studentsŐ written work afterwards to analyze the studentsŐ understandings.

 

These structured field experiences can take place in multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after-school programs, alternate youth centers, or in the schools and classrooms in which the graduate students work.

The final write-up of the project will include a 3-4 page description of the research supporting the methods and tasks used, details on the lesson or interview protocol, and 5-10 pages on analysis and reflection.

Possible Topics: Congruence, similarity, transformations, Pythagorean Theorem, proof and reasoning, constructions, trigonometric ratios, circles, volume and area, visualization and spatial reasoning, angles, platonic solids, Cartesian coordinates, vertex-edge graphs.

 

EDCI 53300         Teaching and Learning Number and Operations

Field Experience:  Research into Practice with Students (50 pts.):  Graduate students will work in small groups of 2-4 to plan a research-based lesson or task-based interview of a series of 2-3 tasks. If a lesson is planned, graduate students will implement the lesson in an appropriate classroom, observe studentsŐ work during the lesson, and examine studentsŐ written work on tasks after the lesson. Ideally, the lesson can be taught twice so that revisions can be made based on feedback.  If an interview is done, graduate students will interview at least two appropriate aged students and examine the video of the interview and studentsŐ written work afterwards to analyze the studentsŐ understandings.

 

These structured field experiences can take place in multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after-school programs, alternate youth centers, or in the schools and classrooms in which the graduate students work.

The final write-up of the project will include a 3-4 page description of the research supporting the methods and tasks used, details on the lesson or interview protocol, and 5-10 pages on analysis and reflection.

Possible Topics: place value, equivalence, numbers systems, understanding of operations, adding and multiplying matrices, permutations/combinations, fractions, decimals, and percents, proportions, scaling, number properties, different base systems.

 

EDCI 54800   Teaching Mathematics to Diverse Learners

 

Field Experience: Case Study of an ELL Student in a Mathematics Classroom (30%)

 

Graduate students will complete a case study – a long-term observation - of the English language development of an ELL in a mathematics classroom. Students will observe the same ELL three different times - at the beginning of the semester, midway through the semester, and at the end of the semester - to determine changes in the ELLŐs vocabulary and syntactic development in correlation with mathematical content knowledge. Students will complete a report on each of these observations, culminating with a final report that discusses the observed changes and proposes a plan for future instruction of this ELL based on the assessment of the ELLŐs language development. Students will relate their observations to current research and assigned readings in the final paper for the course.

Each student is expected to maintain a log of his/her activities during the field-based experience. Students will take detailed field notes during the observations, focusing on how the teacher and students are using language. Before the first observation, graduate students will, in collaboration with the instructor, develop a detailed rubric and observation tool that can be used to organize information gathered from the field experience. These tools will be included as part of the final submission of the report.

In order to complete this field-based experience, the student must be situated in an approved P-12 classroom; this can include multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after-school programs, alternate youth centers, or in the schools and classrooms in which the graduate students work.

 

 

EDCI 54900   Assessment in Mathematics Education

 

Field Experience: Research into Practice (Practice partners)

Situated in an approved P-12 classroom (including multiple settings such as neighboring schools or school districts, day care centers and after school-programs, alternate youth centers or in schools and classrooms), participants will conduct an analysis of classroom student learning over a period of two weeks.  In this task, designed to encourage participants to attend to all studentsŐ mathematical understandings, you will document an individual studentŐs learning of a particular mathematics topic over the course of two weeks.  You will be asked to reflect; before, during, and after; the lessons, on pedagogical strategies that allow teachers to monitor student learning (of all students) most effectively. Students will relate their observations to current research and assigned readings in the final paper for the course. Each participant is expected to maintain a log of his/her activities during the experience, including detailed field notes focused on the studentŐs mathematical experiences. (10 double-spaced pages).

 

BACK TO TOP

MASTERŐS PORTFOLIO  (.doc file)

 

Overview:

Masters Portfolios are purposeful, thematic collections of selected student work that exhibit to the student and others the student's progress, achievement and effort in their MasterŐs degree over time.  The portfolio provides an opportunity to demonstrate general graduate competencies and to provide evidence of a graduateŐs ability to apply instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners and apply technology to enhance student learning. 

 

1.     Table of Contents

 

2.     Table summarizing the primary and additional competencies and/or focus areas met by each artifact (see sample table at end of appendix)

 

3.     Narrative Overview:  About 3-5 pages.  Introduction of the collection. What have you learned in your masters program?  Explanation of how the courses you have taken have developed your thinking.

 

4.     Student Artifacts.  Typically 4-6 artifacts (from coursework, field experiences, conferences, etc.).  For each, provide a 1-2 page Artifact Narrative summary of the artifact and how it demonstrates the graduate competencies and/or special focus areas, and how it contributes to your overall professional development.

 

Review:

The student will electronically submit the portfolio and participate in an oral defense of the portfolio after each committee member has reviewed materials to discuss the rationale for their artifact selections. The portfolio must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the oral defense. 

 

Competencies and Focus Areas:

The artifacts you chose for your portfolio must meet each of the six graduate competencies and two focus areas at least once in a substantive way.  It is likely that one artifact will address more than one competency or focus area. 

 

Examples provided below are designed to show some possible ideas of materials from your program that could be used, but elements of the portfolio are not limited to this list.

 

Graduate Competencies:

 

á  Synthesize knowledge:

o      The candidate will read and synthesize educational literature related to his/her discipline; describe fundamental theories of human learning; and apply knowledge of human learning, diversity, and effective pedagogy to the solution of practical problems in his/her discipline. 

o      Is evident when students:

¤  Develop new methods and materials for mathematics teaching and/or research

¤  Create mathematics classroom materials, lesson plans, or unit plans

¤  Write annotated bibliographies of mathematics education books, articles, or other relevant materials

¤  Develop an advance organizer for a mathematics unit

¤  Apply of mathematics education research in classroom teaching

¤  Prepare a review of the literature on a mathematics education topic of interest

¤  Write a report about a particular aspect of mathematics education

 

á  Create & Discover knowledge:

o      The candidate creates and discovers knowledge to further the state of the art and science of education. The candidate will describe common research methods in his/her discipline, read and evaluate educational research, adhere to ethical standards for the responsible conduct of research, and apply research findings to the solution of practical problems in his/her discipline.

o      Is evident when students:

¤  Conduct a mathematics education mini-study

¤  Conduct a teacher-as-researcher mathematics education study

¤  Create a mathematics education web page

¤  Redesign a course to incorporate current research, theory, and/or best practice in mathematics education.

¤  Create mathematics classroom materials or course papers/projects that demonstrate a connection between research, theory, and practice

¤  Develop classroom plans that demonstrate modifications based on observation of mathematical learning

 

á  Communicate knowledge:

o      The candidate speaks, writes, and employs relevant media to effectively communicate knowledge on substantive topics to others. The candidate will communicate effectively in oral and written formats including the ability to communicate content from his/her discipline through the design and delivery of effective teaching/learning activities that integrate content and pedagogy, adapt instruction and support services to the needs of diverse learners, and assess appropriately learning outcomes.

o      Is evident when students:

¤  Make a presentation to a mathematics education professional group

¤  Submit a mathematics education article for publication

¤  Communicate mathematics knowledge to students

¤  Promote communication among students in mathematics classroom

¤  Serve as a discussion leader for assigned readings (ex: STEM/ STEM education course)

¤  Communicate an understanding of research design in STEM education

¤  Present a report about a particular aspect of education in mathematics education

¤  Create a website to communicate mathematics education resources

 

á  Think critically and reflectively:

o      The candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community).  The candidate will develop a personal vision of inclusive educational practice, identify the relationship of his/her discipline to the broader field of education, and critically evaluate theory and practice.

o      Is evident when students:

¤  Write teaching journals or logs focused on reflective mathematics education practice

¤  Prepare a critical and reflective paper that takes a position on controversial issues in mathematics education.

¤  Develop a critique of an appropriate research study in mathematics education

¤  Conduct a detailed review of a book that contributes to the knowledge base in mathematics education.

¤  Conduct a self-reflection study to evaluate the impact of an intervention on student(s) mathematical learning

 

á  Engage in professional development:

o      The candidate actively seeks out learning opportunities to grow professionally. The candidate will demonstrate the disposition for life-long learning and continuous professional development.

o      Is evident when students:

¤  Attend workshops

¤  Attend professional meetings

¤  Participate in professional organizations

¤  Develop a short- and long-term professional growth plan

¤  Develop and share a resource that could be used by mathematics teachers to assist in teaching

 

á           Participate actively in the profession:

o        The candidate actively participates in the profession through such means as communicating scholarly discoveries, offering learning opportunities to others, and engaging in efforts to serve the greater good. A key feature of Teacher Education at Purdue as a research extensive university.  The candidate will identify communities of practice within his/her discipline and participate within these communities according to the ethical standards of the discipline.

o        Is evident when students:

¤  Publish in mathematics education professional journals

¤  Present at mathematics education professional conferences

¤  Supervise mathematics student teachers

¤  Mentor beginning mathematics teachers

¤  Participate in mathematics or mathematics education professional organizations

¤  Develop and/or conduct K-12 or higher education mathematics education workshops

¤  Participate in mathematics education events such as Math Counts, Math Field Day, etc.

 

Focus Areas:

á  Adapt instruction to diverse learners:

o      The candidate understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. The candidate plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.

o      Is evident in studentsŐ course work in EDCI 54800 and 54900 and field experiences

¤    The mathematics education program was designed to provide opportunities for students to engage around issues of equity in mathematics education.  Equity here is used as a broad construct intended to help us think about how to provide meaningful opportunities to learn for all students in our mathematics classrooms. The notion of ŇdiverseÓ here is also taken broadly. Issues of diversity here include, but are not limited to race, culture, gender, language, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, and mathematical achievement.  This area includes teaching a classroom of diverse learners as well as specific pedagogies that may be helpful for particular groups of students.

 

á  Apply current and emerging technologies:

o      The candidate effectively applies relevant technologies to enhance studentsŐ learning experiences, and actively seeks out opportunities to capitalize on emerging technologies.

o      Is evident in candidatesŐ coursework in EDCI 53300, 534000, 53500, and 53600 and field experiences

¤     Candidates in the program learn, through their coursework, research experiences, and clinical experiences, about the role of technology in teaching, learning, and doing mathematics.  This area includes development, implementation and evaluation of technology that focuses on student learning and/or the impact it has on student learning.

 

 

SUMMARY TABLE

Using APA format where possible, list all portfolio artifacts under the appropriate category (Education Courses, Other Courses, etc.). For each item, put an ŇXÓ under the graduate student competencies or focus areas in the table that your artifact or experience addresses in a substantive way. 

 

Artifact

Synthesize Knowledge

Create Knowledge

Communicate Knowledge

Thinking Critically & Reflectively

Engage in Professional Development

Participate Actively in Profession

Diversity

Technology

 

Education Courses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Courses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Experience